mimetic


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Related to mimetic: mimetic desire

mimetic

Biology of or exhibiting mimicry

mimetic

[mə′med·ik]
(crystallography)
Pertaining to a crystal that is twinned or malformed but whose crystal symmetry appears to be of a higher grade than it actually is.
(petrology)
Of a tectonite, having a deformation fabric, formed by mimetic crystallization, that reflects and is influenced by preexisting anisotropic structure.
(zoology)
Pertaining to or exhibiting mimicry.
References in periodicals archive ?
In every other way, however, Cisneros works to establish the mimetic component of the character.
First, Kita attributes the alleged contrast in (1) to the different dimensions to which a nonmimetic adverbial phrase in (1a) and a mimetic adverbial in (1b) belong (Kita 1997: [8]).
In other words, Richardson sets up a contrast between antimimetic narrative and mimetic narrative, where mimetic narrative refers to "those works of fiction that model themselves on or substantially attempt to depict the world of our experience in a recognizable manner" while antimimetic narrative "contravenes the presuppositions of nonfictional narratives, violates mimetic expectations and practices of realism, and defies the conventions of existing, established genres" (3).
Girard argued that every human relation is a perpetual "dual mimetic relation"; that is, the subject imitates the object, and then the subject responds to the object's response again and again.
Tensor formulations of higher-dimensional mimetic operators are discussed in [6, 20] for rectangular or logically rectangular grids.
This search led him not only to Girard but also to Balthasar, and his 1990 book, later translated as Jesus in the Drama of Salvation, constitutes a novel synthesis of Balthasar's dramatic project and Girard's mimetic theory applied to the Gospels.
Yet this observation is perhaps in keeping with her claim that the undermining of mimetic portrayal in realism anticipates both the linguistic skepticism of modernism and the element of play in postmodernism.
This mimetic desire takes shape within a larger system of sacralization wherein the sacred is in fact violence expunged from the community, while violence itself "is the sacred that formerly occupied a position outside of the city and currently circulates within it, wreaking havoc among its unfortunate participants" (4).
He is the author of nearly thirty books, in which he developed the ideas of mimetic desire (all of our desires are borrowed from other people) and mimetic rivalry (all conflict originates in mimetic desire).
The mimetic model begins with human need--an inherent "lack" within an individual and the search to meet that need.
Known as a "supergene", this clustering allows genetic combinations that are favoured for their mimetic resemblance to be maintained, while preventing combinations that produce non-mimetic patterns from arising.
Rene Girard's work in mimetic theory has found its way into various disciplines--literary studies, anthropology, psychology, theology, and religious studies--no doubt because of the remarkable revelatory power his mimetic theory and scapegoat mechanism have provided for scholars.