mimetic desire

mimetic desire

concept which refers to the inter-dividual nature of desire. The idea of mimetic desire was introduced by the French thinker Rene GIRARD. It has since been appropriated by the American philosopher/anthropologist Eric Gans whose GENERATIVE ANTHROPOLOGY speculates about the role of mimetic desire in the evolution of humanity. Against Freud's theory of the independent nature of desire, Girard's theory follows Hegel and Lacan by arguing that the subjectivity of the self is based on the presence of the other. The concept of mimetic desire is also comparable with the ideas expressed by DELEUZE and GUATTARI. In Anti-Oedipus (1972) they argued that the role of desire in FREUD's OEDIPUS COMPLEX should be regarded as overly reductionist because it fails to take into account the way external sources of desire influence ego formation. For Girard the notion of mimetic desire refers to the self's reliance on the OTHER: the desire of the self is always mediated by the influence of the other that serves as its model. See also LACAN, JACQUES; ORDER/DISORDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
I find it problematic to consider mimetic desire in a nonpsychoanalytical manner, but those interested in a strongly theorized confrontation and criticism of Girard's Mensonge romantique et verite romanesque should find Alling's text deserving of their attention.
According to Rene Girard (whose idea of "mimetic desire" I am summarizing), societies exist only if they can control desire, which, owing to its extremely contagious or "mimetic" nature, can quickly get out of hand and lead to a "mimetic crisis." This crisis is a period of extreme disorder, in which the cultural and symbolic differences that normally structure a society and help to keep mimetic desire at bay--for example, the difference between king and subject, or, to give an example closer to home, the professional difference between a literary critic and a philosopher--dissolve into a general state of undifferentiation.
Mimetic desire is a triangular process involving a subject, a model, and an object of desire.
"Mimetic Desire and the Misappropriation of the Ideal in the Knight's Tale." Exemplaria 8.1: 125-44.
Twombly finds the arc and ache of our mimetic desire within the material itself.
He further asserts that mimetic desire unquestionably involves rivalry, conflict, and violence.
It might appear that the different styles of essay on different types of issue in different writers which are put together here do not always adequately mirror each other, that the book does not always satisfy the sort of basic 'mimetic desire' which might be expected to govern its own structure.
Readers will encounter creatively defined concepts such as myth, history, gospel, mimetic desire, scapegoating violence and the demonic trinity of the diabolos, the skandalon and the Satan.
Cueva y Silva expands on the clues offered by Ovid and, in a way similar to that described by Knoespel, elaborates the story in order to inscribe it within a new context: the patterns of jealousy, rivalry, and revenge which would come to characterize much of the comedia (as in the notorious wife-murder plays, for example) and which this study has interpreted in light of Girard's theory of mimetic desire.
Whether the identification of mimetic desire |reveals the dramatic unity of Shakespeare's theater and its thematic continuity' (6) is another matter altogether, especially since it involves Girard's own highly speculative identification of a small elite section in the original audiences, to which he claims an affinity, who were able to recognize this deep structural motif.
There is much discussion of his ideas mimetic desire, mediated desire, metaphysical desire, and violence.
Here, Mstowska (English, Nicolaus Copernicus U.) carefully considers what the novels actually mean, and finds a certain level of mimesis in them: mimetic desire, mimetic form vs.