mimetic

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mimetic

Biology of or exhibiting mimicry

mimetic

[mə′med·ik]
(crystallography)
Pertaining to a crystal that is twinned or malformed but whose crystal symmetry appears to be of a higher grade than it actually is.
(petrology)
Of a tectonite, having a deformation fabric, formed by mimetic crystallization, that reflects and is influenced by preexisting anisotropic structure.
(zoology)
Pertaining to or exhibiting mimicry.
References in periodicals archive ?
(40) Of particular note in this context are the court dances of bedhaya ketawang and bedhaya semang, through which the sexual union between the rulers of the Mataram dynasty and Ratu Kidul was once initiated and which is still mimetically re-enacted today (Hostetler 1982; Woodward 1989:168; Hughes-Freeland 2008:148).
Reclaiming the name and the space of Wall Street, the camp mimetically reenacted the cosmopolitan center according to a playful mode of political organization, distributing food and shelter without payment, educating all who showed up with makeshift libraries and impromptu lectures, etc.
However, it is important to stress that although steampunk culture provides a reading of a past time, it is not just playing mimetically with clothing and accessories.
Researchers can answer the question: Did the process of institutionalization we observed in the laws happen "mimetically" (i.e., policymakers in different states simply imitating each other), or were there some process of "normative isomorphism" as well (i.e., policymakers learsned "what works" from each other through professional socialization and adopted the best practices)?
stems from the fact that he presents the invented form as if it possessed the attributes of reality, thus allowing it to be mimetically reproduced, in its turn, in another mirror-image that takes the preceding pseudo-reality for its starting-point.
Despite the fact that Rosenbaum's introduction acknowledges the "subjectivity of history" (1), always already ideologically compromised, the essays that follow tend to accept history as a more or less stable field of events--an objective matrix--that precedes narration, something that manga can either distort or mimetically represent.
The commonplace, then, implicated always in ones historical moment, is for Stevens finally an attitude toward "the simple yet striking moments of ordinary life" (124)--moments likely to be "unacknowledged, undervalued, or unrepresented," moments that inspire poems that tend to think about ordinary experience rather than to replicate it mimetically. Such moments are a sane "middle ground" (125) in an age "of ideological endpoints, of conditions that seem overwhelming" with the imagination's proper poetic business not the construction of "dangerous myths" or the transcendence of reality but the contesting of the brute facts of modern life with the aim of helping us persevere.
Moreover, the high quality of the pictures conveys what Gunther Kress and Theo van Leeuwen call "contemporary naturalistic representation" (160), that is, a representation which portrays events and subjects mimetically as close as possible to "the real world." Here, this leads to stress even more the ethnographic connotation of the narrative as we derive the (artificial) perception of "how things really are." Producing a content symmetry with the written text, the majority of images portrays people within their native milieu (34 out of 50).
The lost object, the way in which we all, mimetically, re-narrate what we watch and hear.
I hope to show that digital technologies are complex physiognomies--'gestures'--that mimetically invite, scaffold, and interactively sustain new forms of human being in the world.
She goes on to argue that "whereas authors may [self-consciously] employ 'folk' materials in order to subvert or challenge audience assumptions about the culture represented, readers instead often consume such materials as mimetically 'authentic'" (171).
Socially reflective artworks are then those that remain entrenched within a normative ordering, and mirror this system mimetically; they represent given structures of domination, without affirming something or indeed anything other.