mimosine


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mimosine

[mə′mō‚sēn]
(organic chemistry)
C8H10N2O4 A crystalline compound with a melting point of 235-236°C; soluble in dilute acids or bases; used as a depilatory agent. Also known as leucaenine; leucaenol; leucenine; leucenol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contribution of condensed tannins and mimosine to the methane mitigation caused by feeding Leucaena leucocephala.
Effects of Leucaena leucocephala (Lamk.) Shoot Tips Plus Young Leaf Extract Containing Mimosine on Reproductive System of Male Rats
Potential of mimosine of Leucaena leucocephala for modulating ruminal nutrient degradability and methanogenesis.
Degradation of mimosine in Leucaena leucocephala de Wit by goal rumen microorganisms.
The reduction of mimosine content in Leucaena leucocephala (petai belalang) leaves using ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS).
leucocephala phytochemical profile, there are in its composition compounds as mimosine (b-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-oxopyridyl)]--a-aminopropionic acid), and gallic acids, protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-hydroxyphenylacetic, vanillic, ferulic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids (Chou & Kuo, 1986; Aderogba, McGaw, Bezabih, & Abegaz, 2010; Hassan, Tawfik, & Abou-Setta, 2014).
Phytochemical studies had revealed the presence of alkaloids such as mimosine, crocetin, tubulin, turgorines, flavonoids, tannin, and sitisine.
Many drugs were used to cause cell cycle arrest: a) thymidine, aphidicolin, mimosine, hydroxyurea, and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine were used to cause cell cycle arrest in the S phase; b) N-acetylleucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), nocodazole, colchicine and colcemide in mitosis; and c) lovastatin and Hoechst 768159 in G1 phase (methods reviewed by Uzbekov, (28)).
Considering diet composition, future studies should consider monitoring the presence of Synergistes jonesii, a bacteria capable of degrading 3,4 dihydroxypyridine (3,4 DHP), a degradation product of the non-protein amino acid mimosine present in different leucaena species and resulting from the adaptation to leucaena intake (Hammond, 1995).
This is due to the presence of mimosine which are toxic and can be extracted about 90% through soaking in freshwater [13].