mind


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Related to mind: mind games, subconscious mind

mind

1. the human faculty to which are ascribed thought, feeling, etc.; often regarded as an immaterial part of a person
2. intelligence or the intellect, esp as opposed to feelings or wishes
3. (in Cartesian philosophy) one of two basic modes of existence, the other being matter

mind

the mental faculties, mental experience of the human individual, involving self-consciousness, ‘free will’, thinking processes and unconscious processes. It is a hypothetical, and sometimes metaphysical, construct, which expresses a holistic capacity based on the neurophysiological processes of the brain, yet additively becoming more than these, i.e. an emergent property. Philosophically, there are disagreements about the way to express these properties. Major disputes have existed on the mind-body relation, on whether or not mind and body are to be conceptualized as separate ‘immaterial’ and ‘material’ realms (See DUALISM. MATERIALISM). Related debates (in PSYCHOLOGY) surround the doctrine of BEHAVIOURISM, that scientific psychology can proceed only by analysis of overt behaviour, not mental events. It should be noted, however, that doctrines such as philosophical materialism, which reject a dualism of mind and body, are not necessarily committed to a denial of ‘emergent properties’ of mind for many explanatory purposes. See also STRATIFICATIONAL MODEL OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

mind

[mīnd]
(psychology)
The sum total of the neural processes which receive, code, and interpret sensations, recall and correlate stored information, and act on it.
The state of consciousness.
The understanding, reasoning, and intellectual faculties and processes considered as a whole.
The psyche, or the conscious, subconscious, and unconscious considered together.
References in classic literature ?
"I suppose, if the cat had been gone, instead of the piglet, your mind's eye would see the piglet eating the cat," suggested the Scarecrow.
But the hardest problems are those that arise concerning ways of being "conscious." These ways, taken together, are called the "cognitive" elements in mind, and it is these that will occupy us most during the following lectures.
When he has satisfied himself, in general and in detail, that it was made by such a person as he, so armed and so motived, and to ends to which he himself should also have worked, the problem is solved; his thought lives along the whole line of temples and sphinxes and catacombs, passes through them all with satisfaction, and they live again to the mind, or are now.
Slowly pursuing my walk, I proposed to myself to occupy my mind to some useful purpose by arranging beforehand the composition of the letter which Miss Dunross was to write.
It came back vividly to my mind a few days ago, and has remained haunting me like an annoying tune that one cannot get rid of.
In the Philebus, probably one of the latest of the Platonic Dialogues, the conception of a personal or semi-personal deity expressed under the figure of mind, the king of all, who is also the cause, is retained.
The bare chance that prompt assistance might arrive, and that the books might, by the remotest possibility, be saved, would have been enough, on a moment's consideration, to dismiss any idea of this sort from his mind. Remembering the quantity of combustible objects in the vestry--the straw, the papers, the packing-cases, the dry wood, the old worm-eaten presses--all the probabilities, in my estimation, point to the fire as the result of an accident with his matches or his light.
O, how accursed is that system, which entombs the godlike mind of man, defaces the divine image, reduces those who by crea- tion were crowned with glory and honor to a level with four-footed beasts, and exalts the dealer in hu- man flesh above all that is called God!
But now Celia was really startled at the suspicion which had darted into her mind. She was seldom taken by surprise in this way, her marvellous quickness in observing a certain order of signs generally preparing her to expect such outward events as she had an interest in.
I can't call to mind that anything happened to alarm Rosanna."
"No dust has settled on one's mind then, and it presents a clear mirror to the rays of things.
I HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind. And therefore, God never wrought miracle, to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.