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mind

1. the human faculty to which are ascribed thought, feeling, etc.; often regarded as an immaterial part of a person
2. intelligence or the intellect, esp as opposed to feelings or wishes
3. (in Cartesian philosophy) one of two basic modes of existence, the other being matter

mind

the mental faculties, mental experience of the human individual, involving self-consciousness, ‘free will’, thinking processes and unconscious processes. It is a hypothetical, and sometimes metaphysical, construct, which expresses a holistic capacity based on the neurophysiological processes of the brain, yet additively becoming more than these, i.e. an emergent property. Philosophically, there are disagreements about the way to express these properties. Major disputes have existed on the mind-body relation, on whether or not mind and body are to be conceptualized as separate ‘immaterial’ and ‘material’ realms (See DUALISM. MATERIALISM). Related debates (in PSYCHOLOGY) surround the doctrine of BEHAVIOURISM, that scientific psychology can proceed only by analysis of overt behaviour, not mental events. It should be noted, however, that doctrines such as philosophical materialism, which reject a dualism of mind and body, are not necessarily committed to a denial of ‘emergent properties’ of mind for many explanatory purposes. See also STRATIFICATIONAL MODEL OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

mind

[mīnd]
(psychology)
The sum total of the neural processes which receive, code, and interpret sensations, recall and correlate stored information, and act on it.
The state of consciousness.
The understanding, reasoning, and intellectual faculties and processes considered as a whole.
The psyche, or the conscious, subconscious, and unconscious considered together.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mindful Me can change the trajectory of tweens' lives, helping them weather middle school, high school, and young adulthood.
Sarita Amaya, an assistant administrator of multilingual programs in Oregon's Beaverton School District, adds that being a mindful leader is about "being fully present for yourself and becoming skilled at understanding your feelings, your needs and how to be nurturing, loving and compassionate to oneself.
Ian Prattis offers us valuable insight, wisdom and perspective in finding our way to a healthier world, one based on compassion and commitment, mindful of how everything we do impacts the whole.
The result is a lively 'must have' for any who would cultivate a mindful approach to life.
After a chapter relating the short history of the use of mindful practice in the professional sporting world, the authors offer a six session training program, labeled MSPE (mindful sport performance enhancement) that the reader (coach or athlete or other professional) may follow.
Mindful eating has roots in the ancient practice of mindfulness, or being present in the moment, says Megrette Hammond Fletcher, RD, president of The Center for Mindful Eating.
A new study on the effects of mindful eating - which includes concentrating on each mouthful - found that those who ate this way lost far more weight than other slimmers.
Mindful eating is eating with purpose, eating on purpose, eating with awareness, eating without distraction, when eating only eating, not watching television or playing computer games or having any other distractions, and not eating at our desks.
Carmel Sheridan's The Mindful Nurse was published last year and has already been included on nursing training courses in the UK and the US.
After all, the rabbis tell us that fasting is a way to become more mindful of the suffering around us.