land mine

(redirected from minefield)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

land mine:

see minemine,
in warfare, term formerly applied to a system of tunnels dug under an army fortification and ending in a chamber where either explosives were placed to be detonated at a chosen moment or the supports were burned, causing the mine and the wall above it to collapse.
..... Click the link for more information.
, in warfare.

land mine

[′lan ‚mīn]
(ordnance)
A container filled with high explosives or chemicals, placed on the ground or lightly covered, and fitted with a fuse or a firing device or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul's official citation states: "Lance Cpl Hartley entered the minefield in the full knowledge of the dangerous situation.
Vast minefields and countless cluster bombs laid by the Israeli army before it retreated from south Lebanon in 2000 and during the 2006 war still plague the south.
Caption: LEFT: Staff Sergeant Lou Evans (left, foreground) and Lieutenant Peter Chisholm mapping minefields, August 1953.
The 24-year-old Alaa Agabriya entered the minefield with his cousin and=20 16-year-old brother, who told police they arrived at the site to hunt for= =20 porcupines.
Firmly based on the documentary record, The Minefield is a valuable critique of the Australian, and New Zealand, military experience in South Vietnam.
But he had no idea he was working near to a minefield.
"Christmas parties areincreasingly viewed as a legal minefield by a significant number of employers, particularly since the introduction of laws which outlaw discrimination on the grounds of sex, sexuality, disability or religious belief," said Mr Kelly.
One man's minefield is another penguin's security fence.
In co-operation with their handlers they can scour 100 square metres of minefield in 30 minutes with 100 per cent accuracy.
Robertson sustains his promise as our ride continues on a manicured minefield laced with scruffy CEO's who drive dented cars, and sommeliers who double as successful authors, at a place where most of us would have to spend a fortnight's wages to properly enjoy.
The book is filled with daring rescue missions accomplished by the PJ teams--one mission of note happened in 2002 when the PJs responded to a call to rescue a five-man Australian SAS patrol that had been on a desert recon mission in west Afghanistan and found themselves in the middle of a minefield. The three-man PJ team had to jump from the open ramp into the 210 km/h slipstream of an HC-130 in an almost pitch black night and free-fall to a flashing strobe light adjacent to a minefield 3500 feet below.