mineral suite

mineral suite

[′min·rəl ′swēt]
(mineralogy)
A group of associated minerals in one deposit.
A representative group of minerals from a certain locality.
A group of specimens showing variations, as in color or form, in a single mineral species.
References in periodicals archive ?
The clay mineral suite of each sample was then determined by X-ray diffraction of the 2 tiles, using a Siemens Diffraktometer 5000.
The indicator mineral suite contains grains that are indicative of diamond inclusion chemistry showing high chrome, low calcium G10D pyrope garnets.
The aim of the present study was to carefully characterise the fabric and mineral suite of soil horizons from several profiles in southern NSW previously established to be derived from parna in order to ascertain whether there is any direct evidence to support the model of parna having been transported as fine sand-and silt-sized pellets.
The deposit is unusual in that it has leucoxene as its major constituent which makes the heavy mineral suite of higher value than the ilmenite dominated deposits normally found in south-west of Western Australia.In October 2009 the Western Australian Minister for the Environment approved the Keysbrook project.The Company is now finalising applications for Development Approval for the two shires over which the Keysbrook deposit lies.
The plagioelase and smectite-rich mineral suite of the YG topsoil was not repeated at any of the sand dune sites, indicating that this alluvium does not represent a significant contemporary dust source.
Table 2 Atlas: Resource Estimate Heavy Mineral Suite <pre> </pre>
Voids between different generations of white pyramidal quartz crystals, which make up the lining of the cavity, contain a diverse mineral suite including harmotome, calcite, gypsum and several secondary copper minerals.
(1992) Nissonite, namibite, and other additions to the mineral suite from Iron Monarch, South Australia.
(1992) Nissonite, namibite and other additions to the mineral suite from Iron Monarch, South Australia.
They appear to be genetically related to the larger shrinkage fissures containing the late-stage mineral suite, representing an earlier phase of volatile expulsion.
The heavy mineral suite consists of approximately 65% ilmenite, 30% zircon, and 1.5% each monazite and rutile.