mineralogist


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mineralogist

[‚min·ə′räl·ə·jəst]
(mineralogy)
A person who studies the occurrence, description, mode of formation, and uses of minerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hawthorne, "Crystal chemistry of three tourmalines by SREF, EMPA, and SIMS," American Mineralogist, vol.
In June in American Mineralogist, Hazen and environmental scientist Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University in New York City discuss several reasons why minerals can be rare--so rare, in fact, that the entire world's supply might fit into a thimble, Hazen says.
and Falster, A.U., 1986, Proterozoic sanidine and microcline in pegmatite, Wausau complex, Wisconsin, Canadian Mineralogist, v.
28 Science, mineralogist Oliver Tschauner of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and colleagues describe bridgmanite found inside a meteorite (sample shown, left) that slammed into a remote part of Queensland, Australia, in 1879.
The study was published in the journal American Mineralogist. ( ANI )
Levinson's 1966 article ("A system of nomenclature for rare-earth minerals." American Mineralogist, 51, 152-158) introduced the concept that, instead of coming up with a new name in the traditional way for a new chemical analog of an existing mineral, the chemical symbol for the element substituted in the formula could be tacked on with a hyphen to the back end of the original mineral name.
Sopwith's wooden geological models were sold by Queen Victoria's mineralogist James Tennant at his shop in The Strand, London.
However, a mineralogist dismisses this as flawed chemistry to which CrystalSprings replies that it conforms to EU standards.
10 The word for which fuel was coined in 1556 by German mineralogist Georg Bauer from the Latin for rock and oil?
and Eaton, D.W., 2002, Mineralogical and chemical study of the Regal Ridge emerald showing, southeastern Yukon: The Canadian Mineralogist, v.
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], T.A., 1968, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 2[theta] values for three reflections, American Mineralogist, v.
Charles suspects that his brother, a mineralogist working for a conservation organisation has been murdered, after discovering that the mineral, falconite, could change the face of global warming.