miogeocline

miogeocline

[‚mī·ō′jē·ə‚klīn]
(geology)
A nonvolcanic (nonmagmatic) continental margin, characterized by carbonate, shale, and sandstone sediments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kominz, "Construction of tectonic subsidence curves for the early Paleozoic miogeocline, southern Canadian Rocky Mountains: implications for subsidence mechanisms, age of breakup, and crustal thinning," Geological Society of America Bulletin, vol.
Among the topics are Mississippi Valley-type mineralization and ore deposits in the bank, the Cambrian-Lower Middle Ordovician passive carbonate margin in the southern Appalachians, the development of the Lower Cambrian-Middle Ordivian carbonate platform in the North Atlantic region, Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary rocks of Alaska, tectonic influences on sedimentation in the miogeocline of western central Utah, the Argentine precordillera as a little American carbonate bank, the Sauk megasequence from the Reelfoot Rift to southwestern Missouri, and the Upper Cambrian Gatesburg Formation of central and western Pennsylvania.
Instead of the almost inscrutable lands of the western orogen, we are now poking among braided thrust faults, telescoped facies boundaries and sedately sprawled Early Cretaceous plutonic suites in the northern miogeocline in pursuit of either a cryptic great fault, or 2000 kilometres worth of distributed dextral smearing, or both.
Regional flexing in the Williston Basin to the north, the Trans-continental arch to the south, and the Cordilleran miogeocline to the west caused epeirogenic movements in the Black Hills area.
The rocks were thrust onto the North American miogeocline between Late Triassic and the earliest Cretaceous (Murphy, 2004).
and Leybourne, M.I., 1995, Geochemistry, petrogenesis, and tectonic setting of lower Paleozoic alkalic and potassic volcanic rocks, Northern Canadian Cordilleran Miogeocline: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v.
Neoproterozoic-Cambrian rifting initiated the development of the westward-thickening Cordilleran miogeocline.
Williams, H., 1984, Miogeoclines and suspect terranes of the Caledonian-Appalachian orogen: Tectonic patterns in the North Atlantic region: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v.