misericord


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misericord

, misericorde
1. a ledge projecting from the underside of the hinged seat of a choir stall in a church, on which the occupant can support himself while standing
2. Christianity
a. a relaxation of certain monastic rules for infirm or aged monks or nuns
b. a monastery where such relaxations can be enjoyed

misericord

1. In monastic architecture, a room or separate building where monastic rule was relaxed.
2. Same as miserere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chunko-Dominguez helps modern art historians understand how to read and understand medieval English Gothic misericord carvings.
(14) Examples in the visual arts range from the very simple--an orb, normally with the cross on the top, is inverted, symbolizing the world literally upside down, carved on a misericord in the St.
Thus on a typical page the eye is confronted with such assemblages of bold-faced terms as 'absolution', 'misericord', 'mendicants', 'heaven', 'hell', 'John the Baptist', and the 'Seven Deadly Sins'.
After he had received his blood and his desire, he received his soul, and he put it in the open shop of his side, full of misericord, manifesting the first Truth that only by grace and misericord he received it, and not by any other operation.
Wrth reswm roedd rhaid cynnwys yr Eglwys fel rhan o'r ymweliad gan fod hon yn eglwys mor hynod a chafwyd cyfle i werthfawrogi'r ffenestri perpendiciwlar gyda eu bwa 'ogee',' y seddau 'misericord' a safle'r hen eglwys hynafol o dan llawr Capel Beuno.
The misericord - derived from the Latin word for pity - developed as a means of lending the medieval monks or canons a little posterior support during those interminably long services.
Made a city in 1995 by the Queen - she has her own seat in the cathedral choir which has fine misericord carvings including a chap being seasick - this community of 2,000 or so souls is oddly lacking in drinking places (tiny Solva down the road boasts more pubs) but is now firmly on the eating map.
For an example in which two bundles of wood are made up like a cross, see the misericord at Worcester Cathedral (Anderson, Imagery of British Churches, pl.
The work is not a complete survey of surviving misericord carvings in England, but provides an informative and entertaining overview of the nonfoliate images, and offers an insight into their meaning.
The misericord choir stalls, best of only three surviving probably friary sets, languish damp and neglected in the Old Grammar School.
Called misericords, these twenty-six seats are tip-up seats (traditionally used in churches to perch on if standing during services was taxing!) and under each of them is an ornate medieval-inspired creature.
The illustrated talk, An Exploration of the renowned misericords of Chester Cathedral, will be given by Nick Fry, who will provide a glimpse of the medieval world, uncovering hidden details of medieval symbolism and imagery that are all to be found in the Cathedral's magnificent Quire.