misericords


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misericords

(mĭz'ərəkôrdz`), carvings in Gothic churches that adorn choir stalls provided for the use of the clergy during services. The stalls were carved with biblical scenes that demonstrated the artist's skill and wit. Superb examples of misericords are at Ely, Wells, and Lincoln cathedrals in England.
References in periodicals archive ?
English Gothic Misericord Carvings: History From the Bottom Up
The misericords - sometimes named mercy seats - are the small wooden shelves found on the underside of a folding seat in a church.
Robert Mills's chapter 'Monster and Margins: Representing Difference', for example, explains how those entertaining marginalia in illuminated manuscripts, as well as carvings upon misericords and corbels, can genuinely be understood within the context of contemporary attitudes to such marginalised parts of society as ugly people, the poor, Mongols, Jews, blacks and (it says here) women.
Its church, St Mary the Virgin, is noted for its monument to the Fettiplace family, its medieval misericords and as the burial place of the famous Mitford sisters - Nancy, the novelist; Diana, the wife of British fascist Sir Oswald Mosley; and Unity, friend and admirer of Adolf Hitler.
32) Harold Smith, Some Data on Norwich Cathedral, Volume 3: Bosses, Misericords, Windows, revised February 2006 by J.
72) Frequently bawdy secular and folk imagery, often emblematically depicting folk proverbs and lore incorporating animals like geese and lions as well as pagan classical figures, were found carved into the misericords.
Such misericords are important medieval transmitters of the image that occupies us in the present article, in which I explore only a very small aspect of fifteenth-century transnational and transmedia cross-fertilization: how a scene of human folly moves from manuscript painting to mechanically reproduced art, only to return, much altered, to the hand-produced book.
This form of English popular justice was illustrated in carvings and misericords.
Corpus of Medieval Misericords Iberia: Portugal-Spain XIII-XVI (Corpus of medieval misericords in Iberia: 13th-16th Century) (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2005) 276 pp.
many artists using every kind of form--biscuit moulds, misericords, valentines, crockery, leather, mirrors and body language.
35) Other surviving examples include two early-sixteenth-century painted figures of Death and a young gallant in the parish church at Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire; three misericords in St.