mismatch loss


Also found in: Acronyms.

mismatch loss

[′mis‚mach ‚lȯs]
(electronics)
Loss of power delivered to a load as a result of failure to make an impedance match of a transmission line with its load or with its source.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results prove that the proposed PA serves to be a prominent solution in reducing the mismatch loss between PA and antenna in a wireless transmitter system while delivering a significant amount of output power and PAE.
The [[eta].sub.T] includes the mismatch loss (less than 0.5 dB) and the loss of the traces in the board (0.8 dB).
Next, in order to have acceptable impedance matching at [[epsilon].sub.r1] = 18 and 10 in Figures 9 and 10 when taking into account mismatch loss in real situations, the sizes of the antenna are varied to have the designed resonant frequency.
In addition, the filter is usually connected right after the antenna, and the direct connection between them may induce additional mismatch losses and deteriorates the performances of the filter.
Reduction of mismatch losses in the array by changing the interconnection scheme of the modules in PV arrays have been addressed (Woyte A., Nijs J., and Belmansa R., 2003), (Picault D., Raison B., Bacha S., de la Casa J., and Aguilera J.,2010),(Nguyen D.
Possible causes for this difference are losses occurring in the modularization process and the mismatch losses with the series connection of two halved cells.
These UltraCMOS-based devices enable wide-band tunable networks, minimizing mismatch losses, improving systern efficiency and reducing radio complexity.
Large board mismatches and stubs create mismatch losses that will affect the insertion loss of the system, creating changes in measured gains of amplifiers or other active components.
With only 0.7 to i dB insertion loss per switch, the total front-end matrix path loss through two switches (plus PCB and mismatch losses) is 1.7 to 2.4 dB at the 900 and 1900 MHz cellular bands, respectively.