mispairing


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mispairing

[mis′per·iŋ]
(cell and molecular biology)
Pairing of a nucleotide in one chain of a deoxyribonucleic acid molecule that is not complementary to the nucleotide occupying the corresponding position in the other chain.
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When DNA is alkylated for instance in guanine, apurinic sites could be created which could induce mispairing of nucleotide bases.
This length variation is thought to occur through slipped strand mispairing during replication (Densmore et al.
Because BaP mainly induces G [right arrow] T transversions via mispairing of adducted DNA (Keohavong and Thilly 1992), increased proportions of G^T (as well as G [right arrow] C transversions and deletions) were observed (Figure 1B).
Several reasons may account for discordant interpretations when using telemicrobiology for the remote analysis of Gram stains, all of which occurred in the McLaughlin et al (14) study: (1) poor field selection by the photographer, which decreased the sensitivity of the interpretation; (2) poor image quality, which compromised the accuracy of interpretation; (3) too few fields photographed, which resulted in diagnostic uncertainty by the interpreter; and (4) inappropriate case identification by the interpreter, which resulted in mispairing of the case number and its interpretation.
They are hyper variable in length (Tautz, 1989) as a result of DNA-replication errors, such as slipped strand mispairing (Strand et al.
These amplicons generate some cross-hybridized products with a resulting single-base mispairing in their middle, and generally melt slightly before either of the homozygous products).
Examination of the mutational spectra in these mutant tissues reveals a distinct preponderance of G:C transversions, an observation consistent with the fact that polycyclic aromatic compounds bind primarily to the N2 position of guanine, causing replicative mispairing that converts G:C base pairs to mutant base pairs.
They usually generate mispairing, base pair substitutions and small deletions and insertions in genomes.
These DNA fragments are produced during PCR by slipped strand mispairing mechanism and also were seen in the results of other studies (30), (31).
facilitated by transformation, slipped-strand mispairing, or 2-component regulatory pathways) enables N.
Although the 6-thienyl group of s efficiently prevents the mispairing with the natural pyrimidine bases, y has no such functional group to exclude mispairing with the natural purine bases.
This locus contains a complex repeat structure that is thought to rapidly evolve through slipped-strand mispairing and recombination (5-7).