misrepair

misrepair

[′mis·ri‚per]
(cell and molecular biology)
Repair of deoxyribonucleic acid that gives rise to gene mutations or changes in chromosome structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These breaks are normally repaired by NHEJ, resulting in the introduction of the desired sequence in the DNA, although non-specific misrepair is also possible.
Ionizing radiation can damage DNA, and although your cells repair most of the damage, they sometimes do the job imperfectly, leaving small areas of 'misrepair.' The result is DNA mutations that may contribute to cancer years down the road."
The mutation of the residue aspartic acid by a glutamic acid may occur naturally due to a misrepair on the DNA replication and by a substitution of the third nucleotide of the codons GAU and GAC to GAA to GAG, corresponding to aspartic acid and glutamic acid, respectively.
The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-cyt) assay has been used as a comprehensive method to cytologically evaluate chromosomal instability or damage status, on the basis of the presence of MN, as a biomarker of chromosome breakage or loss; of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), as a biomarker of misrepair of DNA strand breaks or telomere end fusions; and of nuclear buds (NBUDs), as a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA or DNA repair complexes in cultured human and/or mammalian cells.
The observation of NHL-associated translocations or aberrant hypermutation preferentially involving those regions suggests that misrepair of DNA breaks during these events could also contribute to lymphomagenesis.
It may increase reactive oxygen species production, DNA damage, and frequency of misrepair, contributing to malignant transformation and chemoresistance.
BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their misrepair in stem cells are critical events in the multistage origination of various leukemias and tumors, including gliomas.
In addition, misrepair of double strand breaks can cause structural chromosome instability also contributing to neoplastic transformation and cancer (15-17) (49,61).
In discussing the biologic effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the authors, while mentioning the potential cancer-inducing implications of DNA double-strand breaks and their misrepair, do not consider the adaptive response of humans to ionizing radiation.
chromosome misrepair have much more ominous consequences for the
Misrepair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and its relevance for tumorigenesis and cancer treatment (review).