misrule

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misrule

inefficient or inhumane government
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A broader historical distortion conventionally imposed in analyses of Tudor misrule generally, moreover, is that of continuity.
'Sports and follies against the Pope': Cromwellian-Inspired Appropriations of Misrule
This polemical arrogation would, inevitably, radically reshape the meaning of, and the very reasons for, misrule.
In the context of recently successful promotions of polemical misrule, a royal proclamation altering feast days, dated 12 July 1541, documents an effort to impose discontinuity in misrule in that, while reinstituting the lately abrogated Catholic feasts of St.
And, why was there such a marked concern about 'childysshe' misrule engaged in by 'children' or 'boyes'?
At Cambridge, in fact, the recent pattern of misrule reflected not the influence of 'papistry' but that of the innovative and iconoclastic propaganda promoted by radical evangelical reformers.
Here it should be noted that most contemporary evidence, especially that not drawn from 'sixteenth-century partisan propaganda', points to the Boy Bishop ceremony being of a strikingly different character than Reformationera misrule. (17) Whereas an inventory for the Boy Bishop from King's College, Cambridge, in 1505-6 included such carefully preserved items as 'a gowne of skarlett with a whode for the same furred with white', 'a miter of white damaske with ...
John's, in defiance of the 1541 ban on 'counterfaite' churchmen, a Lord of Christmas (ie, Lord of Misrule) and his attendant seasonal revels were promoted in the statutes of 1544-5, whereas neither the prior statutes (1516, 1524, 1530) nor the subsequent ones (1560) mention a Lord at all.
Indeed, at Christ's College, we have definite evidence of evangelical theatrical misrule in the sensational scandal recorded in the 1544-5 letters exchanged between Stephen Gardiner, the traditionalist bishop of Winchester (1531-51 and 1553-5) who was named Chancellor of Cambridge to replace Cromwell during the Henrician regime's religious retrenchment, (33) and protestant Matthew Parker, who was vice-chancellor at Cambridge and, along with the martyred Thomas Bilney and Robert Barnes, one of a pioneering group of Cambridge reformers promoting the Reformation in England.
Gardiner, by contrast, found 'thinges [to] be very far out of ordre both openly in the vniuersitie and seuerally in the colleges'--a measure of how widespread evangelical misrule was at Cambridge--and the Privy Council instructed Parker that 'no suche matter eyther in playe or in ernest [should] be ...