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missing

Missing definition
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

What does it mean when you dream about something missing?

A missing article, such as a set of keys, denotes a sense of being out of control. A missed plane, bus, train, appointment, or time commitment can symbolize a missed opportunity, and the frustration of being behind and unorganized is also suggested. (See also Loss of Something).

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"The girls were up at four this morning, packing her trunks, sister," replied Miss Jemima; "we have made her a bow-pot."
"And I trust, Miss Jemima, you have made a copy of Miss Sedley's account.
And, in this place, it may be as well to apprise the reader, that Miss Fanny Squeers was in her three-and-twentieth year.
Then came a reply, in a tone of honeyed sweetness, from Miss Wylie:
For some time, I am doubtful of Miss Shepherd's feelings, but, at length, Fate being propitious, we meet at the dancing-school.
Beebe, sitting unnoticed in the window, pondered this illogical element in Miss Honeychurch, and recalled the occasion at Tunbridge Wells when he had discovered it.
This undeveloped was the possibility, which Richard Swiveller sought to conceal even from himself, of his not being proof against the charms of Miss Wackles, and in some unguarded moment, by linking his fortunes to hers forever, of putting it out of his own power to further their notable scheme to which he had so readily become a party.
But," said Miss Cornelia, with the air of one determined to take the plunge and have it over, "I will tell you something else.
THIS is the Mouse peeping out behind the cupboard, and making fun of Miss Moppet.
"Was your correspondent lately a pupil at Miss Ladd's school?" she inquired.
Miss Pink, trembling between terror and indignation, acknowledged Lady Lydiard's polite inquiry by a ceremonious bow, and an answer which administered by implication a dignified reproof.
'Now, you mind, you Riderhood,' said Miss Abbey Potterson, with emphatic forefinger over the half-door, 'the Fellowship don't want you at all, and would rather by far have your room than your company; but if you were as welcome here as you are not, you shouldn't even then have another drop of drink here this night, after this present pint of beer.