missed approach procedure


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missed approach procedure

The procedures to be followed if, after an instrument approach, a landing is not effected for any reason. A missed approach procedure generally is followed either when the aircraft has descended to the decision height or altitude and has not been able to establish visual contact with the runway, or it has been directed by air traffic control to go around. Missed approach procedures are published for each individual airfield. Only one missed approach procedure is published for each procedure. See missed approach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let's go back to what AIM 5-4-21(e) tells us: When a preplanned alternate missed approach procedure exists, the holding fix and holding pattern are printed on the approach chart, but the alternate missed approach instructions (altitudes and routes to the fix) are not.
Will you see an alternate missed approach procedure on an RNAV (GPS) approach chart?
Flying an alternate missed approach procedure is not hard.
The illustration in the sidebar on page 21 depicts the "GPS suspend phase" of the KICT ILS 1R missed approach procedure, the steps a pilot should take between initiating the missed approach and reaching the safe turning altitude.
I include a very simple side view of the final altitude to the final approach fix (FAF), a depiction of the descent to the MAP, and a heading-up, overhead view of the missed approach procedure and hold.
It also includes the basics of the missed approach procedure.
The missed approach procedure is a part of the approach, merely an extension of the safe routing for when you cannot fly the final, visual portion of the procedure.
#2 NAV--TUNED and IDENTIFIED as a backup, or for crossbearings or as part of the missed approach procedure)
As you're briefing yourself to fly an instrument arrival procedure, be sure to include a briefing on the missed approach procedure as well.
The missed approach procedure calls for climbing straight ahead until reaching 3700 feet, and then turning toward the holding fix.
The controller instructed the pilot to initiate the published missed approach procedure. The airplane was then observed to track northeast, consistent with the procedure, until radar contact was lost.
Elaine Kauh makes some good points for "climb-in-hold" missed approach procedures (August 2016).