missed approach segment

missed approach segment

That part of an instrument approach procedure between the missed approach point (MAP), the missed approach waypoint (MAWP), or the point of arrival at the decision height and the specified missed approach NAVAID (navigational aid), intersection, fix, or waypoint, as appropriate, at the minimum IFR (instrument flight rules) altitude. It is in the part of the approach procedure that the aircraft climbs and returns to the en route structure or is positioned for holding or subsequent approach. The route of flight and altitudes are depicted on instrument approach charts. See missed approach phases.
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Approach minimums are 800-2 and of course it has a published missed approach segment.
For one, the FAA says a missed approach segment is the only portion "that is not required to be flown for an IAP to be logged.
Do that, and the new approach is appended right at the end of your flight plan without disturbing your current missed approach segment.
If there are towers or hills under the missed approach segment you may not be permitted to descend as low prior to the missed approach point as you would be allowed to otherwise.
The missed approach segment of Z penetrates restricted areas close to the airport.
Unique to this application, GA also activates the missed approach segment of the GPS if the pilot was flying a coupled (autopilot or FD) instrument approach.
From there, you're safe with the standard 200 feet-per-mile climb rate on the missed approach segment.
Decision altitude (DA) on glideslope for precision approaches or the missed approach point (MAP) for non-precision approaches marks the beginning of the missed approach segment.
The missed approach segment takes everything in the first three segments and inverts it in one segment, leaving the pilot in a position to enter the enroute environment to bug out or to restart the approach for another bite at the apple.
Since you may not be anywhere near the missed approach point, you'd better have a plan regarding what you will do that puts you into the missed approach segment and where ATC is aware of your location and routing so they can ensure separation with other IFR aircraft.
Instrument approaches are strictly defined with fixes, frequencies, altitudes, missed approach segments and more, all clearly spelled out on the approach chart.
A conservative pilot would fly transition, initial, intermediate, final, and missed approach segments before making a logbook entry.