missed approach segment

missed approach segment

That part of an instrument approach procedure between the missed approach point (MAP), the missed approach waypoint (MAWP), or the point of arrival at the decision height and the specified missed approach NAVAID (navigational aid), intersection, fix, or waypoint, as appropriate, at the minimum IFR (instrument flight rules) altitude. It is in the part of the approach procedure that the aircraft climbs and returns to the en route structure or is positioned for holding or subsequent approach. The route of flight and altitudes are depicted on instrument approach charts. See missed approach phases.
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The autopilot/navigation system combination has no way of knowing how fast your airplane will climb on the missed approach segment because performance will vary dramatically based on airplane weight, environmental conditions and your piloting technique.
Approach minimums are 800-2 and of course it has a published missed approach segment.
Do that, and the new approach is appended right at the end of your flight plan without disturbing your current missed approach segment.
For one, the FAA says a missed approach segment is the only portion "that is not required to be flown for an IAP to be logged.
However, the obstacle clearance on the missed approach segment is still predicated on the missed approach beginning at the MAP.
If there are towers or hills under the missed approach segment you may not be permitted to descend as low prior to the missed approach point as you would be allowed to otherwise.
From there, you're safe with the standard 200 feet-per-mile climb rate on the missed approach segment. It's a funny twist of the mathematical angles that makes going 300 feet lower require a steeper climb for over 1500 feet on the way out, but that's the way it works out for the TERPS calculations.
Unique to this application, GA also activates the missed approach segment of the GPS if the pilot was flying a coupled (autopilot or FD) instrument approach.
The missed approach segment transitions a pilot from the end of the final segment to a position to shoot another approach or go elsewhere.
The missed approach segment takes everything in the first three segments and inverts it in one segment, leaving the pilot in a position to enter the enroute environment to bug out or to restart the approach for another bite at the apple.
Since you may not be anywhere near the missed approach point, you'd better have a plan regarding what you will do that puts you into the missed approach segment and where ATC is aware of your location and routing so they can ensure separation with other IFR aircraft.
Where practical, re-establish the aircraft laterally and vertically on the published missed approach procedure (for example, a straight-ahead climb, as rapid as possible, may be all that is necessary to re-join the missed approach segment; re-joining a turning missed approach may also be possible if the turn point has not yet been reached).