Mission

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Mission,

city (1990 pop. 28,653), Hidalgo co., extreme S Tex.; inc. 1910. It is a processing and canning center for citrus fruits (especially grapefruit) and vegetables grown in the irrigated lower Rio Grande valley. Consumer goods and concrete are manufactured, and oil wells are also in Mission. The city was founded on property that had belonged to the Oblate Fathers; their chapel still stands by the Rio Grande.

Mission

A diplomatic office in a foreign country; a small church or monastic order.

Mission

 

(1) A state’s delegation to an international meeting or conference. The rights and obligations of heads of missions as well as members are defined by the Convention on Special Missions of 1971.

(2) In diplomacy, a delegation headed by an envoy or charge d’affaires. The regular functioning of such a mission is governed under the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

mission

In Spanish Colonial architecture, a church and complex of buildings usually dependent for support on a monastic order or a larger church.

mission

1. a group of persons representing or working for a particular country, business, etc., in a foreign country
2. 
a. a special embassy sent to a foreign country for a specific purpose
b. US a permanent legation
3. 
a. a group of people sent by a religious body, esp a Christian church, to a foreign country to do religious and social work
b. the campaign undertaken by such a group
4. 
a. the work or calling of a missionary
b. a building or group of buildings in which missionary work is performed
c. the area assigned to a particular missionary
5. the dispatch of aircraft or spacecraft to achieve a particular task
6. a church or chapel that has no incumbent of its own
7. a charitable centre that offers shelter, aid, or advice to the destitute or underprivileged
References in periodicals archive ?
Missional thinking therefore needs re-construction in order to withstand the global experience of the secularization of postmodern capitalist societies.
Church on the Other Side provides preparation, equipping, and nurture for potential and active church planters and missional practitioners as a project of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference.
Thinkers like Lesslie Newbigin, the great twentieth-century missiologist, have shown the relevance of a missional mindset thereto.
What might be happening already that would be promising for the cause of local congregations taking up the missional challenge with new energy and hope?
Scholars argue that missiology is empirical by nature because it investigates God's ongoing missional work in the world in particular socio-cultural contexts.
THE ART OF NEIGHBORING, a wonderful book by Jay Pathak and Dave Runyon, is a helpful addition to missional literature.
The presbytery has a strong missional identity and significant global mission involvement.
Peterson juxtaposes an ecclesiology of the word-event (Luther, Barth, Ebeling, Forde) with an ecclesiology of communion (Congar, Vatican II, the Ecumenical Movement, Jenson) on the way to an examination of the missional church movement (Newbigin, Guder, Van Gelder, Barger).
Darrell Guder, Henry Winters Luce Professor of Missional and Ecumenical Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary and former president of the American Society of Missiology, will lead the series “America After Christendom: The Hardest Mission Field” August 11 through 14 at the fourth Delaware Valley Summer Institute hosted by the Presbyterian churches in Lambertville, Titusville, Stockton, and Mt.
Armstrong suggests simple, immediate ways Christians can foster unity, including prayerful self-dedication to work for a unity that befits the mission of the church sent forth by a missional Trinity's reaching out to the world.
This is significant, as the missional identities of these churches were shaped within a dehumanizing environment controlled by European political and economic systems of colonialism and slavery.
Part 3, mission and ecclesiology, provides practical insight into the following issues: indigenous partnerships and contextualization that help to overcome fears and prejudices; dialogue that moves toward relationship; authentic witness as it relates to the people of God, evangelism and the church; Christian spiritual missiology that challenges us to strive for Christlikeness and the restoration of the image of God as a witness in the real world; practical application of the position and work of a missionary as a learner and servant; and missional practice as applied to the eucharist.

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