mistake

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mistake

[mə′stāk]
(computer science)
A human action producing an unintended result, in contrast to an error in a computer operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
She is mistaken when she refers to her claiming to be Native American in order to be accepted as a student of Harvard University as a mistake.
ENPNewswire-August 2, 2019--Weizmann Wonder Wander: Mistaken but Not Always Wrong: Protein Errors Are under Control; Mapping where these errors occur was a feat they said couldn't be done.
[begin strikethrough](Defendant) claims that [he] [she] [it] should be able to set aside the contract because [he] [she] [it] was mistaken about (insert description of mistake).
The official was caught up in a bizarre case of mistaken identity in Chelsea's 6-0 defeat of Arsenal, sending off Kieran Gibbs rather than Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain for a deliberate handball.
Where an officer is mistaken concerning a law that is "patently unconstitutional," unsettled, or ambiguous, the good-faith exception may apply.
Summary: FUJAIRAH -- People have landed in jail due to mistaken identity in several countries in the past.
Even Jesus Christ did not dare to make such a claim: All he said was, "they know not what they do".Finally, it is important that the Bush-Blair duo did not, and will not, admit that they might have been mistaken in assessing and analyzing the current Iraqi situation.
For Farnsworth, the law imagines a mistaken person forming a "sentence in her head" about what she perceives.
Rhodri Morgan, the Welsh Assembly's First Minister, almost landed a part in the new series of Doctor Who after he was mistaken by BBC staff for a tree-like monster appearing in the show.
(1) Yet, after the ink on the contract has dried, sometimes the parties discover that a key factual assumption on which they based an agreement is mistaken. The proper term of art to describe this situation is "mistake of fact."
While most of the 1, 279, 953 calls this year did result in rescues or investigations, some turned out to be either hoaxes or cases of mistaken identity.
The taxpayer argued he was mistaken as to the availability of a refund because of the letter he had received from the IRS in 2001.