miter joint


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

miter joint

[′mīd·ər ‚jȯint]
(design engineering)
A joint, usually perpendicular, in which the mating ends are beveled.

miter joint

1. A joint between two members at an angle to each other; each member is cut at an angle equal to half the angle of the junction, usually at right angles to each other. See also: Joint
2. A joint between two members at an angle to each other; each member is cut at an angle equal to half the angle of the junction, usually at right angles to each other.

miter joint

miter joint with spline
miter joint
A joint between two members at an angle to each other; each member is cut at an angle equal to half the angle of the junction; usually the members are at right angles to each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
If there's a slight gap between the molding and the wall, don't press the trim tight to the wall and nail it; the miter joint might open up.
13 SQUEEZE a bead of silicone adhesive caulk onto the edge of each miter joint and then fasten the countertop sections together as before.
Or we could have followed the practices of old-time carpenters and simply avoided those miter joints in wide casing.
TIGHTEN THE MITER JOINT BOLTS after applying plenty of glue to both edges.
Spline miter joints. The "splines" are thin pieces of wood, glued into grooves cut across the miter joints.
He cuts some to create seamless miter joints, and presses others into molds to get specific profiles.
It's like a third hand for holding cabinet parts together for assembly, or for clamping miter joints.
Here are a couple of tips about making these shelves: Always buy a few more feet of molding than you need (in case you have to re-cut your miter joints) and, instead of trying to nail the miter joints together (which is just about impossible to do by hand), use a fast-setting adhesive, such as Gorilla Glue's Super Glue.
We used a butt joint to join the three torsion boxes and miter joints on the four corners on both faces and at the four corners on the ends.
The top and bottom rails lock into the balusters with miter joints. Sebastian Davi of Monterey, California, designed the system.
Separate base plates for multiple functions including easy indexing off miter joints and a large surface area for vertical joining applications.
Butt joints will look neater than miter joints over time.