mixed sampling

mixed sampling

[¦mikst ′sam·pliŋ]
(statistics)
The use of two or more methods of sampling; for example, in multistage sampling, if samples are drawn at random at one stage and drawn by a systematic method at another.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem of mixed sampling frequencies is exemplified in Figures 1 and 2.
One solution to the problem of mixed sampling frequencies is to convert higher-frequency data to match the sampling rate of the lower-frequency data.
"Regression Models with Mixed Sampling Frequencies." Journal of Econometrics, October 2010b, 158(2), pp.
2.1.4 Describe the mixed sampling scheme (i.e., concurrent-identical, concurrent-parallel, concurrent-nested, concurrent-multilevel, sequential-identical, sequential-parallel, sequential-nested, and sequential-multilevel).
For example, how does an MSO handle mixed sampling rates?