Moksha

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Related to moksa: moxa, samsara

Moksha

(môk`shə), river, c.375 mi (600 km) long, rising NW of Penza, central European Russia, and flowing generally NW into the Oka River. Its lower course is navigable.

Moksha

 

a river in Penza Oblast, Mordovian ASSR (partly along the border of Gorky Oblast) and Riazan’ Oblast, RSFSR; a right tributary of the Oka River. Length, 656 km; basin area, 51,000 sq km. The Moksha takes its source on the northwestern slopes of the Volga Upland, flowing through hilly areas, and in its lower course over the Oka-Don Plain. It is fed primarily by snow. High water occurs in the upper course in April and in the lower course in April and May. Average discharge 72 km from the mouth is approximately 95 cu m per sec; least discharge is 8.5 cu m per sec, and greatest is 2,360 cu m per sec. The river freezes in November or early December and thaws in April. The main tributary is the Tsna (on the left). The Moksha is floatable and navigable from the Kadoma settlement. There are small hydroelectric power stations along the river; the cities of Temnikov and Krasnoslobodsk are located on the river.

References in periodicals archive ?
Asi como Aquiles cuestiona el sentido de apetn (excelencia), debido a Bavatog (muerte), del mismo modo, Duryodhana pone en entredicho el sentido de bhakti (devocion), como via hacia moksa (liberacion).
Another anomaly is the listing of moksa within the enumeration of the triple set, thus creating a list of four.
Moksa or nirvana represents escape from life rather than liberation to new life.
(2) Jaini (Gender 1) notes that the Digambara Jains "vehemently have insisted that one cannot attain moksa, emancipation of a soul from the cycles of birth and death (samsara), as a female." Though the formation of the Digambara sect postdates the period of early Buddhism, this position is nevertheless noteworthy in the light of the indication given in the Jinacaritra that nuns consistently outnumbered monks throughout Jain history (Jinacaritra 134f, 161f, 176f and 214f counts 14.000 monks against 36.000 nuns under MahavIra; 16.000 monks against 38.000 nuns under Parsva; 18.000 monks against 40.000 nuns under Aristanemi; and 84.000 monks against 300.000 nuns under Rsabha; cf.
As described in Indian literary theory, this experience is the nearest realization through theatre and the other arts of the Absolute or moksa (liberation).
In the first chapter of his book the author discusses the 'Concept of Freedom (Moksa and Nirvana) in Indian Thought', beginning with the historical Buddha whom, apart from being a 'world teacher' and 'great leader of men', he considers 'the originator of a new trend in the Indian philosophical tradition'.
Like much of Indian aesthetic speculation, rasa theory was inevitably linked with spiritual perspectives and examined in relation to the four aims of life recognized in Vedic philosophy--kama, artha, dharma, and moksa. Although kama or pleasure was the apparent aim of art in the view of rasa aestheticians, Abhinavagupta in the 11th Century determined that the ultimate emotional experience in art was the bliss of moksa, spiritual freedom.
Like the other rational discourses, the NS also ensures the four-fold ends (purusartha: dharma, artha, kama and moksa) of life.
The tigress, the naga, and, foremost among them, Hastiwaktra (i.e., Gajawaktra) Devotedly paid homage to the prince, Asking to be instructed in the great doctrine: As to which way should be followed to the Inconceivable, the path to sanya [i.e., ascetic wisdom] Because many are the minds of great yogins [Among which] some, of flawless character, are intent upon moksa [i.e., release from the cycle of rebirths] And there are those who renounce the world completely; it is death which is their dharma [i.e., duty] of choice.
In a typical Korean Baptist church, regardless of its size, the congregation believes that the church cannot exist without a moksa (ordained pastor) or at least a jundosa (unordained pastor).
(20.) Ali Haydar Bayat, 'Turk Tip Tarihinde Akupunktur ve Moksa (Daglama) Tedavisi' (Treatment with moxa and acupuncture in the history of Turkish medicine), Tip Tarihi Arashtirmalari" (Istanbul), 3, 1989, pp.
What I want to achieve--what I have been striving and pining to achieve these thirty years--is self-realization, to see God face to face, to attain Moksa [liberation].