moldboard plow


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moldboard plow

[′mōld‚bȯrd ‚plau̇]
(agriculture)
A plow equipped with a curved iron plate (moldboard) that lifts and turns the soil. Also known as turnplow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Runoff was initiated 20 minutes after rainfall was applied to plots subjected to moldboard plow and seven minutes after rainfall was applied to plots subjected to chisel plow (LSD = 5 minutes).
were severely devastated by SOC losses and soil erosion associated with clean tillage (i.e., frequent use of the moldboard plow) for cotton production, but changes in crop production practices since 1920 have begun a restoration of SOC and soil productivity (Bruce and Langdale 1997).
The moldboard plow was the only tillage tool considered with plowing simulated in opposite directions.
If they are, and more acreage is shifted to no-till, (for example, from moldboard plow tillage,) then the potential impact upon water quality, both surface and groundwater supplies, is
In studies with other types of soil, such as acriferric Red Latosol, larger area was mobilized using moldboard plow, followed by scarifier and disc plow (Carvalho Filho et al., 2008).
In contrast to the moldboard plow, the chisel plow does not turn the soil over, and it provides minimal incorporation of residues (Figures 13-7 and 13-8).
Thus, no-tillage corn produced greater yield on well-drained sandy loam and silt loam soils but less yield on a dark and poorly drained soil than moldboard plow for continuous corn (Griffith et al., 1973).
Other accessories include a moldboard plow for extra-deep tilling and a grain-drill attachment for planting in rows.
Conventional tillage, the primary form of tillage since invention of the moldboard plow, involves two stages.
The moldboard plow and McCormick's reaper transformed the farms of the world, while industrial production altered entire economies and elevated the living standards of society.
About 600, they are supposed to have invented the moldboard plow. This had a knife blade, or coulter, that cut deep into the ground, a plowshare that cut grass and stubble at ground level, and a shaped moldboard above the plowshare that lifted and turned the soil.
Thomas Jefferson had made the first studies of plows in America and designed a moldboard plow according to the distinctive requirements of American soil, but he never applied for a patent.