molecular fossils

molecular fossils

[mə¦lek·yə·lər ′fäs·əlz]
(geology)
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Organic geochemistry uses molecular fossils, called biomarkers, to study the impact microbial processes have had on the environment.
"Molecular fossils are important for tracking early animals since the first sponges were probably very small, did not contain a skeleton, and did not leave a well-preserved or easily recognizable body fossil record," Zumberge said.
He added, "The bright pink pigments are the molecular fossils of chlorophyll that were produced by ancient photosynthetic organisms inhabiting an ancient ocean that has long since vanished."
"The bright pink pigments are the molecular fossils of chlorophyll that were produced by ancient photosynthetic organisms inhabiting an ancient ocean that has long since vanished," said Nur Gueneli from the Australia National University (ANU) Research School of Earth Sciences and the paper's first author.
Pseudogenes were previously regarded as molecular fossils, non-functional by-products of genome evolution.
Compounds like diasteranes, which resist breaking down in the environment and can remain in oil for millions of years, are referred to as "molecular fossils." Like the bones of dinosaurs, they can give scientists a window into the past.
These genes, considered molecular fossils of an ancient born a virus, have also turned up in searches of a variety of other mammalian genomes.
Now, a team of scientists has identified a family of these "molecular fossils" that may be evidence of early sponges living more than 635 million years ago.
Scientists call these chemicals "molecular fossils." They can exist even when more obvious fossils, like the imprints of leaves or seashells pressed into rocks, do not survive the extreme heat and pressure of being buried deep in the Earth.
"In our research, we use molecular fossils, or biomarkers, such as oleanane to provide evolutionary and paleoenvironmental information from sediments and petroleum." Perhaps, one day, this technique will help solve Darwin's "abominable mystery" once and for all.
By examining deep-sea sediments of molecular fossils, a team of British, American and German scientists has concluded that global cooling over the last 3.2 million years has been five times greater than previously believed.
coypus by reviewing the current data and establishing a case for the analysis of specific genomic retroposons, molecular fossils of the nutria's evolutionary descent.

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