molehill


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molehill

the small mound of earth thrown up by a burrowing mole
References in periodicals archive ?
But Ferguson accused compliance officer Clare Whyte of 'making a mountain out of a molehill' while admitting he was involved in similar scraps in almost every derby throughout his ten years at Ibrox.
'I, however, request you (the media) to not make a mountain out of a molehill for your ratings.
The latter phrase was once a popular Jacobite toast due to the fact that King William - he of the Orange persuasion - was killed when his horse tripped over a molehill.
But then eight-year-old visitor Thea Baker, from Gateshead, noticed an object on a molehill in front of Wallington Hall.
However, later, playing down any differences with Pakistan Muslim League-Quaid in the province, Governor Punjab Chaudhry Sarwar said Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf's coalition partners are like a family, hence anyone shouldn't make a mountain out of a molehill.
Thea Baker with the 1968 5p coin she found on a molehill at Wallington Hall.
The benefit show, which also features Molehill, Jess Godwin and Tall Doug, will raise funds to help defray expenses related to Lewis' medical therapy.
At the time of the first, the club said the tax department was making a "mountain out of a molehill" in a row over a bill paid a few days late.
"For us, it's making a mountain out of a molehill. It's not even really a molehill."
However some think he is just a molehill that uses camera angles to look like a mountain.
They're making a mountain out of a molehill' ('DOJ chief: I'm not fake news king,' News, 7/11/17).
Timothy Brownlow notes that Clare's poetry tends to be written from the perspective of a molehill: "The higher the view point, the more generalized and idealized the view; the lower the viewpoint, the more particular details will crowd out or even obscure the general and the ideal, and assert their own disturbing independence." (48) Writing from below in his taste for the small and particular, Clare recognizes the "disturbing independence" of moles and other small mammals, birds, and insects gaining subsistence from the land with no observation of property boundaries.