molybdenum disulfide


Also found in: Wikipedia.

molybdenum disulfide

[mə′lib·də·nəm dī′səl‚fīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
MoS2 A black lustrous powder, melting at 1185°C, insoluble in water, soluble in aqua regia and concentrated sulfuric acid; used as a dry lubricant and an additive for greases and oils. Also known as molybdenum sulfide; molybdic sulfide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stanford team started with a 10-nanometer-thick layer of molybdenum disulfide. To transform it into a transistor-like switch, they bathed the material in liquid rife with lithium atoms.
The universal technique can be used with a range of different 2-D materials, including hexagonal boron nitride, tungsten disulfide, and molybdenum disulfide.
The scientific team used grapheme and molybdenum disulfide alongside thin layers of gold, alumina and silicon nitrate to create a device that can be tailored to the size and shape of the retina.
Additional modification of the magnetic sorbent Sap7 with molybdenum disulfide increases the number of the Bronsted base sites (pK = 7[??]6, pK = 12.8) on its surface in comparison with Sap7, but still there are less of them than in saponite.
The researchers used molybdenum disulfide and tungsten disulfide and treated both materials with high-frequency sound waves to break them up into thin sheets and incorporated them into the carbon-rich gel matrix.
Bizhan Rahmati et al [17]:- This article reports, the Morphology of surface generated by end milling AL6061-T6 using molybdenum disulfide ([MoS.sub.2]) nanolubrication in end milling machining.
These include safety glasses, high-temperature gloves, arm protection, and nickel or molybdenum disulfide antisieze compound.
The transistors fabricated with the molybdenum disulfide (Mo[S.sub.2]) films demonstrate good on/off current ratio and high carrier mobility [7-10, 16-19], which make them very suitable for next generation transistors devices.
Here, the authors report on the large-scale, spatially controlled synthesis of heterostructures made of single-layer semiconducting molybdenum disulfide contacting conductive graphene.
As we've all read many times, molybdenum disulfide is a very "slippery" product.