monadic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

monadic

(programming)
unary, when describing an operator or function. The term is part of the dyadic, niladic sequence.

monadic

(theory)
See monad.

monadic

One. A single item or operation. An instruction with one operand.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of them are hologramic reproductions of the primordial monadic totality of the autogenic World-Body-Self most cogently articulated in the Yagwoia archetypal self-symbolisation as the ouroboric World-Tree.
Consider the monadic circle or dot more intensively, however, and it will invariably be found out to have three distinct parts only one of which is represented in the icon itself.
It equals the lower of the two monadic trade dependence scores (bilateral trade/GDP) in the dyad for a given year, lagged one year to avoid reciprocal effects of conflict on trade.
In this same interview, Chappell distances himself from his own early fiction, in which the mind is depicted as what might, in fact, be called "monadic." For example, in his first novel, It Is Time, Lord (1963), the protagonist James Christopher describes the mind as "an isolated citadel standing in a desert ...
Utopian liberalism argues for the civilization project more "narcissistically" and in a more antistate vein (by emphasizing the monadic autonomy, competitive will, and rational self-control of an individual) than does expressive liberalism, which stresses the importance of positive public authorities, social interaction, and emotional ties in the bettering of Finns' lives (social competence to express one's inner feelings to others).
A maximal conjunction of monadic universals may not uniquely specify an individual, but must not a maximal set of tropes do so?
Two fundamental results in this context are the famous Buchi Theorem [Buchi 1960], which says that monadic second-order logic (MSO) over strings precisely characterizes the regular languages, and Fagin's Theorem [Fagin 1974], which states that existential second-order logic (ESO) exactly expresses the NP properties over finite structures (in particular, over finite strings).
As a consequence, these thinkers seem to have assented to the dubious idea of discrete, monadic social universes that coexist through the multicultural alchemy of something called "topology." In his introduction, Dainotto offers an incisive analysis of the recent critical tendency to privilege the discourse of "positionality." What may we read behind the very politically correct concern for the local and the regional?
The regularities concerning transitional democracies (Mansfield and Snyder 1995; Ward and Gleditsch 1998) and the constraints on great power democracies (Morgan and Campbell 1991) are stated in monadic form.
This language of the monadic structure of reality, so seemingly foreign to the perspectives of traditional theology and philosophy, was in fact an attempt to overcome problems inherent in the new science and the rationalist world-view for the sake of a traditional emphasis on the value and integrity of the individual.
The currently fashionable postmodern discourse has its own answer: it leaves the market fully intact while debunking the nation-state and seeking to dissolve it even further into little communities and competitive narcissisms, which sometimes gets called "multiculturalism." In other words, postmodernism seeks an even deeper universalization of the market, while seeking to decompose "social humanity" even further, to the point where only the monadic individual remains, with no dream but that of, in Jean-Francois Lyotard's words, "the enjoyment of goods and services." Or, to put it somewhat differently: the postmodern utopia takes the form of a complementary relationship between universalization of the market and individualization of commodity fetishism.
So clear, ingenuous and monadic do they feel that they seem to have been composed in the state of mind of a child lost in construction of his sand castle, or sand kingdom.