monarch

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monarch

1. a sovereign head of state, esp a king, queen, or emperor, who rules usually by hereditary right
2. a large migratory butterfly, Danaus plexippus, that has orange-and-black wings and feeds on the milkweed plant: family Danaidae

Monarch

A data capture program from Datawatch Corporation, Chelmsford, MA, (www.datawatch.com), that is used to transfer data from mainframe and minicomputer reports to the PC. It uses report files that contain data ready to print. Users identify the data directly from the report format on screen, and the program copies the data into the fields of various database or spreadsheet formats for the PC.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the defeat of the king had been a terrible blow to British royalism, revulsion against regicide brought about a new popular monarchism, especially in Scotland and Ireland.
(37.) Some critics falsely claim that Hamilton, in his multi-hour presentation at the 1787 Constitutional Convention (June 18), praised or proposed monarchism. In fact, he simply stressed that the British Constitution was better (more pro-rights and pro-liberty) than anti-Federalists would admit, and that Britain, at least, was a constitutionally limited monarchy (better than anarchy).
Hamilton, like many other financial and business elites in America during the Founding Era, embodied the curious contradiction of rejecting Old World monarchism and embracing the principles of natural law and limited government--while hankering after the mercantilist economic system favored by the Old World.
Here, in a series of articles, he addresses the Russian monarchy's political culture, and the ways in which the combination of monarchism and specifically Russian cultural aspects has influenced the growth of Russian law, and the concept of nation and its transformation to imperial ideology.
HISTORIANS OF, SAY, 19TH OR EARLY 20TH-CENTURY labour would certainly not be surprised to encounter monarchism, militarism, and manliness as the raw materials of an invented national tradition pushed by a faux-nostalgic elite.
He became a part of the Whig Party, the origins of which lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute rule.
This inquiry is justified by Pines' in-depth discussion on several continuous characteristics of Chinese imperial system and political culture: the persistent belief in the "Great Unity" and in absolute monarchism; the theoretical omnipotent monarchs and the practical "checks and balances" of the imperial bureaucrats; the literati class as the locus of both political and moral/cultural authority; and the exclusion of commoners from actual political processes.
Again, this is not to suggest that these women's politics were at all similar: de Stael's cosmopolitanism could not be further from Piozzi's British nationalism and monarchism. But what both realize is that politics is performance and in some measure always virtual, a system of belief whose authority stems less from metaphysical essence than from a repeated practice.
But it is compatible with monarchism, which is supremely unpopular in Quebec.
In "Precedents," Raphael travels the familiar road from American monarchism at 1750, through its opposition to programs by Parliament and placemen, to the rejection of the king in the Declaration of Independence, followed by the creation of strong state governments with varying forms of executives, bound together loosely by a weak confederation with no executive (and no governing power, for that matter).
Islamists demand an immediate transition to democracy through constitutional monarchism, whereas tribal activists desire economic concessions in the form of jobs and development prior to any large-scale political change.
However, absolutist monarchism is echoed in a note in the Artscroll Siddur: "Regarding modern-day elected rulers, opinions differ.