monkeypox


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to monkeypox: Monkeypox virus

monkeypox,

rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus, which is related to the viruses that cause smallpox and cowpox. The symptoms of monkeypox, which typically take 1 to 2 weeks to appear and last for 24 weeks, are similar to but milder than those of smallpox. Fever and chills, headache, muscle aches, and backache, and a feeling of exhaustion precede the development of swollen lympth nodes and a rash, which often first appears on the face before spreading elsewhere on the body; the rash lesions ultimately develop into pustules that open and then crust over. As many as 10% of cases result in death. There is no known treatment for monkeypox; the smallpox vaccine, antiviral drugs, and vaccinia immune globulin can be used to control an outbreak.

Human monkeypox infections occur when a person comes into contact with an infected animal or person or virus-contaminated materials such as bedding; the virus enters the body through a bite, scratch, or cut or abrasion in the skin or through the nose, mouth, or eyes. The virus is transmitted primarily by respiratory droplets, bodily fluids, or material from the lesions. Two distinct groups of monkeypox virus strains exist, Central African and West African. The latter generally results in milder cases with fewer deaths, and is not usually spread person to person.

Monkeypox was first identified in 1958 when outbreaks occurred in monkeys used for research; the disease also has been found in rodents. The first case in humans was recorded in 1970 in the Congo (Kinshasa). Monkeypox has since been reported in humans in other parts of central and W African. The only known outbreak outside Africa occurred in the United States in 2003; it was caused by a West African strain that came from small mammals imported from Ghana.

monkeypox

[′məŋ·kē‚päks]
(veterinary medicine)
An animal virus that causes a smallpox-like eruption but only rarely infects humans and has little potential for interhuman spread.
References in periodicals archive ?
As of June 18, a total of 87 cases of monkeypox have been reported to CDC from Wisconsin (n = 38), Indiana (n = 24), Illinois (n = 19), Ohio (n = 4), Kansas (n = 1), and Missouri {n = 1).
Traceback investigations have been initiated to identify the source of monkeypox virus introduced into the United States and have identified a common distributor where prairie dogs and Gambian giant rats were housed together in Illinois.
The most common disease that can be transmitted from pet monkeys is monkeypox which can be fatal.
Over the course of that year, nearly 100 people across the Midwest were diagnosed with monkeypox after coming in contact with infected prairie dogs.
In the past, these cases have always turned out not to be smallpox and were, usually, either chickenpox or monkeypox cases," he said, stressing that the reports had been of suspected cases.
The sixth edition of this popular and comprehensive reference has been thoroughly revised and offers extensive updates including new chapters on human bocavirus and mimiviruses, as well as expanded chapters on metapneumovirus, coronaviruses, and monkeypox.
The 2003 outbreak of monkeypox originated from imported Gambian rats for sale to the public in an Illinois pel shop.
agencies restricted the sale of prairie dogs after dozens of people contracted monkeypox from them in 2003.
And CMS contends that because it continues to use ICD-9-CM it has problems identifying emerging recent global health threats such as anthrax, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and monkeypox.
And CMS contends that, because it continues to use ICD-9-CM, it has problems identifying emerging recent global health threats such as anthrax, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and monkeypox.
And CMS contends that because it continues to use 1CD-9-CM it has problems identifying emerging recent global health threats such as anthrax, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and monkeypox.
2003 Crazes for prairie dogs and Gambian giant pouched rats are cut short by a monkeypox outbreak and a federal ban on further sales.