monkshood


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Related to monkshood: Aconitum, foxglove

monkshood:

see aconiteaconite
, monkshood,
or wolfsbane,
any of several species of the genus Aconitum of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercup family), hardy perennial plants of the north temperate zone, growing wild or cultivated for ornamental or medicinal purposes.
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monkshood

[′məŋks‚hu̇d]
(botany)

monkshood

any of several poisonous N temperate plants of the ranunculaceous genus Aconitum, esp A. napellus, that have hooded blue-purple flowers
References in periodicals archive ?
The scene also reminds us that Brigitte has adamantly refused Sam's offer of heterosexual rescue: that they leave town and secure enough monkshood for her to live a manageable life.
PLANT FLOWERS like Sedum spectabile, Monkshood and Goldenrod that start in late summer and keep going into autumn.
Now, here are a few flowers you don't want to eat: delphinium, larkspur, monkshood, digitalis (i.
The medium pink colour of the rose blends beautifully with the dark purple of the monkshood.
As the historian Ishii shows, the Thai state made great efforts in replacing the indigenous monkshood with a system of regulated monasteries tied to the centre of Thai power, even as that shifted from Ayuthhaya to Thonburi (Ishii 1986).
That dark-blue, terrible colour of the strange rich monkshood made Hepburn look and look again.
Monkshood (William James Clarke), and books by various authors on Bret Harte, Swinburne, Arthur Wing Pinero, Hall Caine, and George Meredith.
Monkshood (Aconitum) - They are often planted under trees or spring flowering shrubs at the back of a border, bearing tall spikes of helmeted flowers in blues and purples in the summer.
HV Plants include: BANANA, CALABASH, JACARANDA, MARRAM GRASS, SASSAFRAS, EVERGREEN, SPEEDWELL, IRIS, COTTONWOOD, DOGWOOD, MONKSHOOD, FUNGUS
Noble died after coming in contact with the poisonous monkshood plant while on a hike in Newfoundland.
95) that serpent venom, toxic honey, monkshood, black hellebore, deadly nightshade, yew berries, frog toxin, rhododendron sap, stingray spine, jellyfish, dung beetles, and bug guts (not to mention rabies, anthrax, smallpox, curare, and bubonic plague) have, from antique times, been smeared on arrows, spears, swords, and blowgun darts, or shot out of catapults during sieges, or used to poison crops and well, by everybodv from Alexander the Great to the Holy Crusaders, including Hittites, Scythians, Spartans, Trojans, Romans, Persians, Hindus, Muslims, and Marcus Aurelius.
The Northern wild monkshood (Aconitum noveboracense), a threatened plant, also grows on these sites.