monoamine oxidase inhibitor


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Related to monoamine oxidase inhibitor: SSRI, Selegiline, monoamine oxidase inhibitor diet

monoamine oxidase inhibitor

[män·ō′am‚ēn ′äk·sə‚dās in′hib·əd·ər]
(pharmacology)
Any drug, such as isocarboxazid and tranylcypromine, that inhibits monoamine oxidase and thereby leads to an accumulation of the amines on which the enzyme normally acts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Recommended dosages of monoamine oxidase inhibitors Medication Starting dosages Usual therapeutic_dosage Selegiline transdermal 10 mg twice a day 30 to 60 mg/d Tranykyprornine 15 mg twice a day 45 to 90mg/d Isocarboxazid 6 mg patch/d 6 to 12 mg patch/d Pheneizine 10 mg, 2 or 3 30 to 60 mg/d times a day Source: Adapted from reference 8 Depression subtypes.
Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are also prescribed for social anxiety disorder, and some studies show they are more effective than the SSRIs in treating this condition.
The product is contraindicated in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma or urinary retention, and for patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) currently or within the past 14 days.
MDMA also interacts dangerously with some prescription drugs (including monoamine oxidase inhibitors, a class of antidepressants), and it raises heart rate and blood pressure, of special concern for people with cardiovascular conditions.
People taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI's) should avoid overripe bananas, a source of tyramine, which interferes with these medications and can cause serious side effects.
All decongestants can interact adversely with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), tricyclic antidepressants, indomethacin, beta blockers, methyldopa, some general anesthetics, digitalis, antihypertensives, rauwolfia alkaloids, other central nervous system (CNS) stimulants, and possibly theophylline.
Other medications that have been cited in studies include cyclobenzaprine for musculoskeletal complaints, monoamine oxidase inhibitors for patients with atypical depression and over-the-counter analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen for flu-like symptoms and muscle aches (Kantrowitz et al., 1995).
There are three types of drugs: Tricyclics, for people with sleeping difficulties; MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors, for anxiety and depression; and Specific Seratonin Re-uptake Inhibitors including Prozac and Seroxat.For help, you can call the Depression Alliance on 0171 633 9929 or the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 0345 90 90 90 (local rate).
Lofepramine should not be administered at the same time as or within two weeks of stopping treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. It should then be introduced cautiously.
Modern standard prescription antidepressant medications traditionally fall into three classes: heterocyclic antidepressants (HCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), and lithium salts.
Known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), this radically new class of drugs offers distinct advantages over the older tricyclics, heterocyclics, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Whereas the older drugs required weeks of experimentation to arrive at a correct dosage, the SSRIs are usually prescribed at one pill a day.
Among the wide range of medications that may affect sexual functions are diuretics (water pills), antihypertensives (blood-pressure medicine), antiarrhythmics (for irregular heart-beat), antihistamines (for allergies), antiandrogens (for certain cancers), anticholinergics, ulcer medications, cancer drugs, central nervous system depressants, sedatives, hypnotics, antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, antipsychotics, and alcohol.