monocotyledon

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monocotyledon

any flowering plant of the class Monocotyledonae, having a single embryonic seed leaf, leaves with parallel veins, and flowers with parts in threes: includes grasses, lilies, palms, and orchids

monocotyledon

[¦män·ə‚käd·əl′ēd·ən]
(botany)
Any plant of the class Liliopsida; all have a single cotyledon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to less response of monocots for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, particle bombardment method was used to transform monocotyledonous crops genetically (Christou et al.
The three vegetative branching types commonly described in palms are similar to the branching types used for the monocots (Tomlinson, 1990): axillary branching, apical dichotomous branching, and non-axillary branching.
The number of ARFs of switchgrass in each cluster was about twice than those of five other monocots (maize, rice, sorghum, foxtail millet, and Brachypodium) but not consistent with the number of ARFs in ten dicot species (Arabidopsis, citrus, Chinese cabbage, poplar, cotton, soybean, Medicago, tomato, Grandis, and grape), which indicates that differences in the evolution of ARF genes in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.
Hemicellulose content, the proportion of fiber that can be digested by ruminants (i.e.: the difference between NDF and ADF contents) averaged 29.6% for the monocot and 15.9% for dicots.
Hence may provide scientific community in depth knowledge about the diversity and prevalence of mastreviruses globally, not only in monocots but also in dicots together with begomoviruses.
Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of the transgenic plants demonstrated that overexpression of dicot phyB from Arabidopsis thaliana shows pleiotropic effects in the monocot crop M.
[47] P McSteen, "Auxin and monocot development," Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in Biology, vol.
It appears that the substrate preference for COMTs might even not be shared by the monocot species.
Among the flowering plants, 61 species belonged to dicots and 16 species were monocots. Among the 45 families, dicot plants belonged to 33 families, while monocots were represented by 8 families.
Monocots constitute approximately 20 per cent (70,000 species) of all higher plants and include numerous groups of the highest conservation, ecological and economic importance, such as grasses, sedges, orchids, palms and aroids.