Monogenism

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Monogenism

 

the doctrine in anthropology which asserts that mankind has a single origin and that all the human races are related to one another by blood kinship.

According to monogenism, contemporary mankind has one species (Homo sapiens), and the human races are intraspecific subdivisions that formed as a result of modern man’s settling in various areas of the world. Monogenism is confirmed by a multitude of anthropological facts and above all by the fact that all the human races yield fertile offspring when mixed.

References in periodicals archive ?
in the final analysis, both appear to support monogenesis (the single source hypothesis) of language and its strictly human faculty (4).
But the defense of monogenesis, so central to Kidd's arguments, was equally pronounced among Catholic theologians, and Church punishments for pre-Adamite heresies were also severe.
While dramatizing the consequences of slavery's genealogical disruptions, the incest plot also acknowledges a broader conceptual problem entailed in the advocacy of monogenesis as a viable alternative to nineteenth-century deterministic racialism and a reconciliation of the post-Reconstruction racial divide.
Eliot's writings as a whole strongly suggest that she had no sympathy with their views and like Darwin supported monogenesis.
This includes the ongoing debate over monogenesis and polygenesis, and the argument over the appearance and origins of the Bible's key actors.
Until the mid-nineteenth century, ethnologists overwhelmingly defended Genesis and embraced monogenesis.
The monogenesis theory, in simple terms, maintains that the Portuguese presence in Africa beginning in the fifteenth century gave rise to an Afro-Portuguese pidgin that evolved into all creoles including Papiamentu.
He argues that other differences--such as religion--proved more divisive than racial distinction, which became a vehicle for Enlightenment thinkers who included black writers Olaudah Equiano and Ignatius Sancho, to express skepticism toward the church by problematizing its official doctrine of monogenesis.
For a critical and thorough review (as of 1975), see James Stayer, Werner Packull and Klaus Deppermann, "From Monogenesis to Polygenesis: The Historical Discussion of Anabaptist Origins," MQR 49 (Apr.
4) Monogenesis is the belief that the activity of only
It is not that it must be so, but that, if the data warrant it, then the presupposition of such a monogenesis, if you will, can help in understanding forms that are otherwise opaque as to their meaning.
Given his criticism of the three major confessions of his time, he has no sympathy for missions, and he justifies his position by opposing monogenesis (the theory that all humans descended from Adam) and by extending the experience of the discovery of new peoples and continents to the possibility of human populations dwelling on infinitely numerous stars.