Monogenism

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Monogenism

 

the doctrine in anthropology which asserts that mankind has a single origin and that all the human races are related to one another by blood kinship.

According to monogenism, contemporary mankind has one species (Homo sapiens), and the human races are intraspecific subdivisions that formed as a result of modern man’s settling in various areas of the world. Monogenism is confirmed by a multitude of anthropological facts and above all by the fact that all the human races yield fertile offspring when mixed.

References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, Boas's point of view may be still valid, but there is by now an already impressive amount of scholarship dealing with "monogenesis" or the theory that all earthly languages have a single primeval source, the "mother tongue" (see at least Pedersen 1962, Greenberg 2005, Dolgopolsky 1998, Bomhard 1984, 1994; Ruhlen 1991, 1994, 1994b), the most recent contribution to this field of research being the monumental work by Bomhard (2008), and the most impressive scientific corroboration to it being the entire work of Luigi Luca CavalliSforza, who in 2002 in a conference in Paris came to state the following:
4.3 On the origin and universality of the faculty of language: Monogenesis
Los elementos del relato comunes a ambas versiones permiten defender la hipotesis acerca de la monogenesis. Asi, el mito de Savitri y el mito de Orfeo constituirian reelaboraciones en dos contextos distintos de un protomito indoeuropeo que habria combinado el encuentro con los dioses de la muerte y el discurso mediante el poder de la palabra.
The problem became even more complicated when a fierce controversy developed over the question of monogenesis or polygenesis.
"La monogenesis y la formacion de algunos criollos de base portuguesa".
While her descriptions of polygenesis, monogenesis, and polycentrism are well-described, her account of human evolution smacks of early twentieth-century evolutionary theory rather than contemporary theory.
The most recurrent theme in these chapters is his discussions of the ways that orthodox defenses of monogenesis (the doctrine of mankind's common descent from a single ancestor) "promoted the notion that ...
More than that, as the nucleus of the monogenesis of the long poem, Winter is more coherent in its ideational program than The Seasons in that it limits its scope to the engagement with and praise of the sublimity of Nature and its creator.
It is also striking that these writers clearly intend to teach monogenesis, or the idea that all humans were created by the same God, and thus endowed with the same natural abilities and subject to the same rights.
By the middle of the nineteenth century, "polygenesis," the theory that each "race" of man developed from distinctively different progenitors, had "supplanted monogenesis as the new scientific common sense" and posited "a new kind of human body" permanently and essentially "endowed with 'race'" (48).
She published two extended treatises in the field of ethnology, both of which make arguments for the single-origin theory of human genealogy, known in nineteenth-century ethnological debates as the theory of monogenesis. Hopkins often articulated her monogenism through references to the apostle Paul's "one blood" decree, and she maintained arguments for the decree's scientific implications.
And attendant to such claims, Kidd points out, were ideas about monogenesis and polygenesis, and he deftly shows how these arguments impacted nineteenth century discussions about slavery and abolitionism (particularly in the United States), for example, and about the contested claims of Jesus' "race" and "ethnicity." In addition, Kidd contextualizes the forms of "racialised religion" (203) that emerged during the nineteenth century (e.g., Mormonism and Theosophy) and twentieth century (e.g., Christian Identity Movement), and locates these groups, not as independent Protestant offshoots necessarily, but into the stream of biblical interpretation through racialized lenses.