monomania

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monomania

an excessive mental preoccupation with one thing, idea, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He here recollects, beyond his staring into the fire that melts blubber, how the Pequod, including its crew, was the "material counterpart" of Ahab's "monomaniac [...] soul" (423).
Any man who has heretofore imagined that he has sounded the depths of human folly and human wickedness will be amazed when he considers the affair at Harper's Ferry It is generally regarded as the insane attempt of a monomaniac; an act which, as it is without precedent, and is likely to remain without parallel, whose intense silliness is only equaled by its atrocity, would be ludicrous had not the blood of some of our best citizens made it tragic.
It is necessarily an evil thing in any light." Fermi opposed Edward Teller's strident advocacy for the H-bomb's development and is remembered for his remark that Teller was the only monomaniac he knew with more than one mania.
Dunn posits Poe as anticipating the health sciences, focusing on dark temperance, perverseness, incestuous siblings, ill and suffering figures and dying, monomaniac characters.
Rossini, she wrote, was suffering from "a neurosis which, altering his fibres, rendered him almost monomaniac ...
That may be the fervent dream of monomaniac "civil servants," but it is a nightmare for most coherent Americans.
monomaniac incarnation of all those malicious agencies which some deep
(8) Other more or less transparent hoaxes include his invention of other mouthpieces like the fictional "Cossu," whose hyperbolic criticism sends up the critical establishment; the mock-medieval introduction to "The Leper"; and his faux reviews (i.e., "The Monomaniac's Tragedy, and Other Poems, by Ernest Wheldrake," and "Les Abimes.
He explores the rise of the moral tale, the moral tale comes of age: Maria Edgeworth and the romantic novel, discipline and narrate: the moral tale and the Newgate novel, Charles Dickens and the instructive monomaniac, and 1859 and after.
(70) Gunter Dallmann also recalled that, 'Pfemfert was a fanatic, during his active life a monomaniac for literary and political feuding, never inclined to compromise, and persistently adhered to a rigid friend-foe approach'.
On the first level he is one-dimensional and lacking even the most rudimentary hinterland to retreat to - which makes for an intriguing window into the world of the monomaniac. On another level, however, he's a normal human being, a popular and affable man doing his best to stop these pesky other dimensions diverting him from his singular purpose.
After Genesis, the Good Book generally falls away into a humorless So-So Book at best, a Bad Book mostly, getting worse as it goes along, sinking into the New Testament's celebration of a deluded monomaniac, who brings the good news that the world is ending even as he speaks, thereby forming a cult around himself that shapes the world we live in now.