mononucleosis


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mononucleosis

1. Pathol the presence of a large number of monocytes in the blood

mononucleosis

[‚män·ə‚nü·klē′ō·səs]
(medicine)
Any of various conditions marked by an abnormal increase in monocytes in the peripheral blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unusual clinical and laboratory features such as lack of signs and symptoms of mononucleosis, positive antinuclear antibodies, or negative serologies in young children or immunocompromised patients can confound the clinical picture.
Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization.
EBV causes mononucleosis, and has been associated with a growing number of other diseases.
Hilton, "Splenic rupture in infectious mononucleosis: a systematic review of published case reports," Injury, vol.
The diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis was based on the patient's history, physical examination, laboratory findings, serological detection, and heterophile antibody test.
Proliferation of mononuclear cells causes lymphadenopathy associated with infectious mononucleosis and can mimic other more serious underlying conditions, such as lymphoma.
Typical symptoms of infectious mononucleosis include extreme fatigue, fever, sore throat, and head and body aches.
Although EBV-associated infectious mononucleosis is a well-known syndrome presenting a wide range of symptoms and signs, it sometimes has an atypical and misleading clinical presentation that leads to diagnostic challenges and dilemma.
Acute acalculous cholecystitis associated with infectious mononucleosis is rarely described in the literature.
Patients with infectious mononucleosis may present with a non pruritic, faint rash during the course of the disease, which is believed to be caused directly by the virus.
Although the most common clinical findings of infectious mononucleosis are fever, cervical lymphadenopathy and tonsillopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract obstruction is a rare complication (1,2).
In an article entitled "Mononuclear Leukocytosis in Reaction to Acute Infection (infectious mononucleosis)," which appeared in the Bulletin of the John Hopkins Hospital in 1920, the authors described the clinical characteristics of the causative organism of the disease.