Monorhyme

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Monorhyme

 

a poem in which all the lines have the same end rhyme. Widely used in Oriental poetry, the monorhyme was the object of poetic experiments in Europe during the Middle Ages and thereafter was almost exclusively a form of humorous verse, such as A. P. Sumarokov’s “Vain Precaution” and A. N. Apukhtin’s “When You Become Students, Children.” N. Aseev’s “Wasn’t the Firmament Blue?” is a monorhyme.

References in periodicals archive ?
An example is the word qasida, which--in contrast to its dictionary meaning of the genre of monorhymed, monometered ode, whose themes include love, wine, and praise of political patrons--is often used in India to denote a religious poem in Arabic, particularly praise of the prophet or Imams.
But this innovative use of metaphor in a poem that does not adhere to the traditional monorhymed hemistich clearly allows the poet to be more precise in depicting the complexity of his emotional and spiritual reality.
Only the text of the song is given in the manuscript, where it is caned a lai and resembles other poems with this title inserted into prose romances of the 13th century.(12) These are usually long poems in monorhymed quatrains, using a grand chant manner: