monostatic radar


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monostatic radar

[¦män·ə¦stad·ik ′rā‚där]
(engineering)
Conventional radar, in which the transmitter and receiver are at the same location and share the same antenna; in contrast to bistatic radar.

monostatic radar

monostatic radar
A radar arrangement in which the transmitter and the receiver are located in the same place and usually form the same piece of radar equipment. This arrangement allows the transmitter to be synchronized with the receiver, and the timing method to measure the target range is simpler to implement.
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In monostatic radar, motion of the target towards or away changes the frequency of the reflected signal, this is the Doppler effect, says Chen.
Using the direct method that requires direct sight between transmitter and receiver, the solution complements the previously available ZVR software that provided only monostatic radar estimates.
According to the Taylor expansion theorem, the ranges between the radar and targets can be expressed as polynomials for both monostatic radar and bistatic radar [22-25].
The prototype developed is a monostatic radar, based on FMCW concept; although this type of sensors exploits an old technology [7], they are currently employed for several applications, thanks to their small overall dimensions, reduced consumption, and limited costs.
In the above (4)-(8) [R.sub.0] is the distance from the observation point (monostatic radar) to the origin, coinciding with the 'source surface point', k is the wavenumber of the incident EM wave (k = 2[pi]f/c, where f is the frequency of the incident EM wave), R is the Fresnel reflection coefficient of the tangential plane at the point of interest, [[theta].sub.s] is the direction of the observer and [f'.sub.r] is the derivative with respect to its argument (x).
But, in the specific conditions of the scenario under analysis (monostatic radar and incidence direction of 87[degrees] < d < 90[degrees]), results of the analysis show that backscattering from the mast is significantly higher than from the rotor and not dependent on blade rotation.
Monostatic Radar Cross Section of a Dielectric Sphere
Similarly, one of the main techniques employed to diminish a target's monostatic radar cross section (RCS) is based on the modification of its shape so that most part of the energy impinging on it is redirected towards directions different from the source.
The demonstrator will be based on a monostatic radar model, where the transmitter and receiver are co-located, but ESA hasn t ruled out a bistatic model where the receiver is in a different location and the system can transmit constantly.
Two-dimensional vector current plotting of the surface current and two-dimensional plotting of the monostatic radar cross section are available.
Bistatic radar uses existing sources of illumination to detect and track targets passively, instead of the more conventional monostatic radar systems that actively send a signal and wait to receive a return echo.
Most radar systems in use today are monostatic radar systems, i.e., they rely on a single site to perform both transmitting and receiving functions.