monotone


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monotone

Maths (of a sequence or function) consistently increasing or decreasing in value

monotone

[′män·ə‚tōn]
(science and technology)
A quantity which never increases (or which never decreases) as a function of some other quantity. Also known as monotonic.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is well-known ([MRR83]) that the set of ASMs is in bijection with the set of Monotone Triangles with bottom row (1, 2, .
5), has a unique solution, if a potential operator A is bounded, radially continuous, coercive and uniform monotone.
Similarly, according to the definition of convex hull monotonicity, the type of monotone segments can be determined by its vertices.
n] are positive real numbers, then we realize that they are operator monotone and therefore have decreasing relative risk premium.
i) Because f'(x) is strictly monotone in interval (a, b), we can easily prove that
The fuzzy sequence space [lambda] has monotone distance.
Our investigation is directed to conclude the existence of at least one solution and, if we try to use monotone iterative techniques, to ensure the existence of only one solution.
Unlike civilized society, whose joyless monotone had alienated him, the primitive idyll had not been meddled with or manipulated.
monotone, cyclic and mixed histories-mission profiles); varying loading-slip directionality; the full spectrum of rate effects, including creep-relaxation, slow, very rapid and shock rates of loading; material-component processing effects (i.
In retrospect, I wish I had just left him laying down and went and got his bottle out of the kitchen," she says in an exhausted monotone.
The specs of the CDMP12l5 remain identical to its predecessor (8-320Kbps bit rate, VBR support and 10 hours of playback) and the only other change is a purely cosmetic one, changing the body color of the machine to a monotone silver (it was formerly silver and blue or silver and gray).
David Crystal, a linguist one of whose specialties is intonation, once noted that the recitation of written liturgy takes place in something close to a monotone (100-102).