mood disorder

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Related to Mood disorders: Anxiety disorders, Personality disorders

mood disorder

[′müd dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mood disorders in particular have evidence for dysbiosis in low-level inflammation and leaky gut pathology, which is present in patients with depression, Dr.
"The priority is to provide more natural strategies for the treatment of mood disorders, depression and anxiety," he added.
The second driver of the increase in mood disorders and depression is attributed by Twenge and others to the decline in sleep duration as measured in other studies.
Approximately one in five women will experience a perinatal mood disorder in their lifetime, and parenting partners and fathers can also experience depression and anxiety after the birth or adoption of their child.
Though he was not involved in this study, psychiatrist Jeff Huffman, MD, director of the Cardiac Psychiatry Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, agrees that addressing mood disorders effectively may go a long way in preserving heart health and physical health, in general.
The results suggest that "headache, particularly migraine, is associated with respiratory and other neurologic and developmental disorders, as well as with anxiety and mood disorders," the authors wrote.
They also add to evidence that mood disorders are the result of dysfunction in brain circuits.
The sample was then divided into four groups; there were 172 children with parents who had a mood disorder but the children did not have CBCL anxiety/depression subsyndromal elevations (high-risk group); 22 children without a parental history of mood disorder but had CBCL anxiety /depression subsyndromal elevations (subsyndromal major depressive disorder); 22 children with a parental history of mood disorder and CBCL anxiety/depression subsyndromal elevations (high-risk and subsyndromal major depressive disorder); and 186 children in a control group with no parental history of mood disorder or CBCL anxiety/depression subsyndromal elevations.
Disruption to the body clock increases the risk of mood disorders and depression, a large study has confirmed.
The study found those who did not follow the natural cycle were more likely to have mood disorders such as severe depression and bipolar disorder.
Ohio State University researchers found children with bipolar disorder had higher blood levels of proteins associated with vitamin D compared to children without mood disorders. Their study appears online in the journal Translations!