moot

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moot

1. a discussion or debate of a hypothetical case or point, held as an academic activity
2. (in Anglo-Saxon England) an assembly, mainly in a shire or hundred, dealing with local legal and administrative affairs
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ninth Circuit rejected this mootness argument, stating that the agencies merely continued the same behavior challenged by Conservation and the new consultation did not remedy the alleged failures in prior consultations.
because there was no mootness question before the district court, so we are not reviewing that.
16) Courts throughout the United States have looked to Rule 23 and its interpretive precedent in determining the FLSA collective action mootness issue.
On appeal, the Fifth Circuit held that the Equal Protection Clause does not require discriminatory intent, and remanded the case to the lower court to determine questions of mootness and reconsider the constitutional claims.
The 7th, 9th and 11th Circuits have allowed this tactic in FLSA cases, but the 3rd, 5th and 10th Circuits have rejected the strategy, finding that a plaintiff may move to certify a class even after being offered complete relief on his individual claims in order to avoid mootness.
the rights of the listener limiting the stock of information mental exploration a megaphone today, I will address the mootness question what will happen in the future I certainly hope so your honor, they owe me some money the corporation can not have opinions that is unanimous money is speech and speech is protected it cannot squelch the right of the public to hear
Other such prudential doctrines are some aspects of standing (rules against third party standing, citizen standing, and taxpayer standing), and ripeness and mootness doctrines.
outcomes exist: the government's refusal to prosecute, mootness, a
Cases could be filed too soon, raising questions of ripeness, or too late, raising questions of mootness.
The appeals court reversed and remanded, finding that the inherently transitory exception to the mootness doctrine prevented dismissal of the case.
276) Paralleling this study's critiques of the Arar decision, Professor Resnik points out that, "Reinhardt has registered objections to various doctrinal developments, such as 'standing, mootness, ripeness, prejudice, waiver, estoppel, procedural default, and retroactivity principles,' that diminish the role of the federal judiciary" (277) and are often indicative of "officialdom ignor[ing] humanity.