moral career

moral career

the identifiable sequences in a labelling process in which a person's identity (particularly deviant identity) and moral status is progressively changed. For example, the moral career of the mental patient (GOFFMAN, Stigma, 1963) in which the patient is first 'S ane’, then a patient, and finally an expatient. In this process the entire biography of a person may be reinterpreted in the light of the ‘moral’ evaluations progressively imposed. Compare DEGRADATION CEREMONY.
References in classic literature ?
Oo peased wi' me?" and I had thought it a good opportunity to make a few salutary remarks upon her late moral career, and said: "No, I am not pleased with you." I recalled to her mind the events of that very morning, and I put it to her how she, as a Christian child, could expect a wise and good uncle to be satisfied with the carryings on of an infant who that very day had roused the whole house at five AM.; had upset a water-jug and tumbled downstairs after it at seven; had endeavored to put the cat in the bath at eight; and sat on her own father's hat at nine thirty-five.
Although Goffman (1959, 1961) identified and defined the 'pre-patient' phase in the moral career of a psychiatric patient or 'inmate', he did not identify and define its equivalent; the 'pre-psychiatrist' phase in the moral career of those professionals whose aim it is to help him.
Sociological studies of the 'moral career' of police officers show that almost all policemen everywhere find themselves initiated into a life of graft by the routine offer of a bribe ('pangmeryenda' or 'pangsigarilyo').
According to Goffman, a crucial moment in the moral career of the mental patient is the act of internment in an asylum, because of the transition from being a person to being a patient and the sharp reduction in free adult status implicit in this transition (1).
The moral career of the drug addict undergoes an important change when his addiction is discovered and he goes from being a "discreditable" person to being a "discredited" person (Goffman 1963): For the first time he must measure himself against the definitions that others make of him and his situation.
Paugam, 2005, " The Moral Career of Poor Patients in Free Clinics ", Social Science & Medicine, 61 : 1369-1380.
Erving Goffman, Stigma: Notes on The Management of Spoiled Identity (Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1963) is the principal text, but see, also, idem, "The Moral Career of The Mental Patient," Psychiatry: Journal for The Study of Interpersonal Processes 22 (May, 1959): 123-42.
The moral career departs from the strict focus on work and occupations, concentrating on the interaction between the psychological experiences of individuals and the structural conditions that influence their movement through a particular social world.
That Used to Be Us': Animality, Humanity, and Moral Careers in the Buffyverse" somewhat less focused than I expected from the title; while it deals with the moral implications of animal elements in human characters, such as Oz's werewolf component, the author includes monsters and perceptions about race in her broad definition of animality; the definition almost becomes too broad to be useful, and doesn't even touch on episodes like "The Pack" (1.6, where Xander and other Sunnydale students are possessed by the spirits of demon hyenas).
These omissions are a significant oversight for a book that wants to approach gambling sociologically and is, in part, about the moral careers of people who develop problem gambler identities.
"Happiness" is not an abstract given, an objective and formal framework into which our desires are fit, but is rather a conception built up by individuals in the course of their moral careers. This "from the ground up" approach can ease much of the anxiety produced either by the Platonic assumption that one's life is not conforming to a preestablished harmony or by the hedonist assumption that one is not particularly adept at calculating the play of pleasure and pain.
One such group, described by Bogdan and Taylor (1989), is people "in caring and accepting relationships with severely disabled people," who "have moral careers that humanize rather than dehumanize" (pp.