morals


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morals:

see ethicsethics,
in philosophy, the study and evaluation of human conduct in the light of moral principles. Moral principles may be viewed either as the standard of conduct that individuals have constructed for themselves or as the body of obligations and duties that a particular society
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.
References in classic literature ?
I can't tell you just now what the moral of that is, but I shall remember it in a bit.'
There is no just ground, therefore, for the charge brought against me by certain ignoramuses -- that I have never written a moral tale, or, in more precise words, a tale with a moral.
I am no great admirator of your old morals, as you call them, for I have ever found, and I have liv'd long as it were in the very heart of natur', that your old morals are none of the best.
"Down, you base thing!" thundered the Moral Principle, "and let me pass over you!"
Conflicting moral codes have been no more than the conflicting weapons of different classes of men; for in mankind there is a continual war between the powerful, the noble, the strong, and the well-constituted on the one side, and the impotent, the mean, the weak, and the ill-constituted on the other.
"For moral courage is a worthless asset on this little floating world.
He had learnt his craft at the school of Alexander Pope, and he wrote moral stories in rhymed couplets.
The construction of a fable involves a minute attention to (1) the narration itself; (2) the deduction of the moral; and (3) a careful maintenance of the individual characteristics of the fictitious personages introduced into it.
As to whether any moral change accompanies a physical one, I can only say that I have met no proof of the fact.
(1) Which of the two sovereigns is imbued with the Moral law?
Cover up a pound of earth never so cunningly, divide and subdivide it; melt it to liquid, convert it to gas; it will always weigh a pound; it will always attract and resist other matter by the full virtue of one pound weight:--and the attributes of a person, his wit and his moral energy, will exercise, under any law or extinguishing tyranny, their proper force,--if not overtly, then covertly; if not for the law, then against it; if not wholesomely, then poisonously; with right, or by might.
But that is not all, that is not his worst defect; his worst defect is his perpetual moral obliquity, perpetual--from the days of the Flood to the Schleswig-Holstein period.