moribund

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Related to moribundity: morbidity

moribund

[′mȯr·ə·bənd]
(biology)
In a dying or deathlike state.
In a state of suspended life functions; dormant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(47) Nevertheless, what must be emphasized is that no matter what specific political ideology underpinned the denouement of settler stories in Cuba, Angola, or South Africa, all were encased, at least historically, within the same emotional ecology of moribundity, which, crucially in the context of our reading, was related to the policy of whitening.
There had been the target National Match version before WWII, resurrected as the Gold Cup in the latter 1950's, the decade in which Jeff Cooper almost single-handedly brought the 1911 pistol back from moribundity. There was also the Colt Commander, its barrel length shortened from 5 to 4.25 inches, and introduced circa 1950 with a lightweight aircraft aluminum frame, the first such auto to hit the market.
While this allows his challenge greater potency, the principle Naranappa stands for never quite manages to shake off the air of gruesome moribundity.
There is a need for critically evaluating forecasts of language moribundity and extinction.
I think Eliot was demonstrating how wrong snobbery can make you when he wrote that most people are "very little alive." Actually, it is the intelligentsia among us, secular or religious, who may be better acquainted with spiritual moribundity. But Eliot may have been on firmer ground when he added that to bring people to an awareness of spirituality "is a very great responsibility" Wiman's spirituality is sane and healthy and accessible to anyone not too sure of what they know and believe.
Termite mortality and moribundity were recorded once or twice per day for 7 days.
The worlds Nihei creates exist, therefore, within an ontological zone of terminality, but in a double-sense: terminality first of all as a state of exception, a threshold of crisis, a profound moribundity; but also terminality in the sense of nexus (as in "computer terminal" or "Net Terminal Genes"--genes that are (apparently) dead, but that would allow humans to connect the mundane and virtual spheres), where one possible mode of existence bleeds into another, where new sorts of connections (biological, social, political) are as it were forced upon us, where we have to adapt.
For Schopenhauer, the metaphysical need arises from man's amazement over his existence, particularly over his moribundity. Schopenhauer defines metaphysics generally as "every knowledge which transcends the possibility of experience, i.e.