mortise-and-tenon joint


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

mortise-and-tenon joint, mortise joint

mortise-and-tenon joint
A joint between two wood members that is formed by fitting a tenon at the end of the one member into a mortise in the other member; the mortise and the tenon are usually cut or shaped with a mallet and chisel. After fitting the tenon into the mortise, a hole is drilled through them with an auger; then a wooden peg (treenail) is driven into the hole to secure the joint. Also called a mortise-and-pegged joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two-pin dowel and mortise-and-tenon joints assembled with polyvinyl acetate adhesive were considered as traditional adhesive-based joints, and minifix plus dowel and screw joints were considered alternative non-adhesive-based joints.
The moment capacities of a number of dowel joints and mortise-and-tenon joints have been investigated.
Some mortise-and-tenon joints were strengthened by the use of dowels, which functioned like a pin driven through both parts to give the lock between them extra strength.
Kessel conducted full-scale tests on oak and spruce mortise-and-tenon joints with two octagonal oak pegs to provide tension design criteria.
2001a, 2001b) indicate that round mortise-and-tenon joints are well-suited for use in school chair and desk frames constructed of small-diameter timber.
The test consisted of determining the short- and long-term deflection characteristics of wall cabinet frames and panel-on-frame wall cabinets that use round mortise-and-tenon joints in their construction.
It's a solidly built, fully assembled jig that creates matching mortise-and-tenon joints with a plunging router.
The specific objective of this paper was to determine the strength and durability of a traditional style desk frame constructed of solid wood with round mortise-and-tenon joints and a laminated desk frame constructed with lap-joint rectangular mortise-and-tenon joints.
Cut the panel and mortise grooves, and the tenons using a table saw (see "Cutting the Mortise-and-Tenon Joints," below).