mortising machine

mortising machine

[′mȯrd·ə·siŋ mə‚shēn]
(mechanical engineering)
A machine employing an auger and a chisel to produce a square or rectangular mortise in wood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the equipment found In the LEED-certified former factory building, includes: a Weeke CNC machining center, Felder shaper and horizontal boring and mortising machine, Brandt edgebander, SCMI pin router, Altendorf sliding table saw, Blum hinge boring and insertion machine, Universal Laser Systems laser engraver, Powermatic table saws and planer, Moak jointer, Whirlwind sander and Buttering widebelt sander,
Then the holes were given a rectangular shape using a mortising machine." A hole was drilled lengthwise through the hub using a wood bit driven with a T-handle; reamers were used to taper the hole.
The flat and raised panel doors and face frames are mortised and tenoned together using a Maka mortising machine and a Medalist tenon cutter.
offers the Maka HBA series horizontal routing, boring and mortising machine. Some of its features include computerized multi-axis programming, automatic tool changer, single- and double-sided configurations and supplementary working units.
Cutting Machinery, Cutting Tools, Dovetail Machines, Dowel Inserting Machines, Dowel Machines, Gluing Machines and Equipment, Mortising Machines
Making it (most commonly from second-growth Canadian white cedar) requires really big debarking skinners, tenoners, and mortising machines and is more properly a modern industrial product than handmade rustic.
Briquetting--Pellitizing & Compressed Wood Log Machines, Dovetail Machines, Fingerjoint Machines & Systems, Jointers, Mortising Machines, Moulders/Planers, Planers & Surfacers, Profiling Machines, Ripsaws, Routers --Pin, Sanding Machines, Saws--Cutoff, Shapers, Tenoners/Combo--Single End & Double End
Since most 20th century furniture factories were equipped with table saws, mortising machines, planers, drill presses, and the like, the mind-set of most furniture factory owners was to have their draftsmen design furniture to the limitation of the machines, thereby avoiding costly handwork.