moschellandsbergite

moschellandsbergite

[‚mō·shə′lanz·bər‚gīt]
(mineralogy)
Ag2Hg3 A silver-white mineral consisting of a silver and mercury compound; occurs in dodecahedral crystals and in massive and granular forms.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Spencer, the crystal shows "brilliant metallic lustre with silver-white colour, much resembling the crystals of amalgam (silver-amalgam) from the Palatinate (Rhenish Bavaria)"--by which Spencer was probably referring to the mineral moschellandsbergite, which was not named until 1938.
They're all here, in multiple samples ranging in quality from "study grade" to absolutely superb: Freiberg acanthite and stephanite, Schneeberg proustite and erythrite and roselite and uranium-bearing species, Andreasberg pyrargyrite and dyscrasite and fluorite and pink apophyllite, Siegerland malachite and anglesite and millerite and galena, Schwarzwald fluorite and barite and silver, Obermoschel cinnabar and moschellandsbergite, Ems pyromorphite and cerussite, Johanngeorgenstadt mimetite, Ohrenstock hausmannite, Fichtelgebirge topaz and microcline and herderite, Ehrenfriedersdorf cassiterite and fluorapatite, Ilfeld manganite, Ronneburg whewellite, Hagendorf phosphates ...
Associated minerals are tennantite, moschellandsbergite, cinnabar, mercury, perroudite and iltisite (Szakall and Sarp, 2000).
Kolymite occurs as metallic, silvery xenomorphic grains 10-40 [micro]m across, in copper and closely associated with moschellandsbergite. It was identified in a polished section by microprobe analysis and optical characteristics.
Moschellandsbergite is rare, found only in the siliceous limonite in the Adolf mine section.
Perroudite occurs as resinous, somewhat crude, transparent, orange red to red, columnar crystals, 0.l--0.5 mm long, and as thin crusts and coatings, associated with capgarronite, mercury, cinnabar and moschellandsbergite (Szakall and Sarp, 2000).
set out to describe every piece, but I'll "label" a few I especially liked which were not pictured in the issue: arsenopyrite/stannite from China (12 x 12 cm); ilvaite/quartz from Dalnegorsk (12 x 15 cm); hambergite from Afghanistan (a transparent blade 7 cm high); childrenite from Afghanistan (a perfect, loose 4.5-cm twin); arsenic from Germany (a smooth, perfect sphere 3.5 cm in diameter); moschellandsbergite from Germany (many crystals to 1 cm covering a 7-cm matrix); silver from Michigan (an electric-white arborescent tree 12 cm high); elbaite from Afghanistan (an 8 x 10 x 12 cm blue-pink polished-treestump lookalike on matrix).