vertical transmission

(redirected from Mother-to-child transmission)
Also found in: Medical.

vertical transmission

[′vərd·ə·kəl tranz′mish·ən]
(genetics)
Passage of genetic information from one cell or individual organism to its progeny by conventional heredity mechanisms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The First Lady said health outreaches in Ghana for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission during the 2018 World AIDS Day were successful enough to be used as case studies by ABOTT to get other countries to conduct similar outreaches.
Karin Hulshof, Unicef regional director in the East Asia and Pacific, said early testing, diagnosis and treatment were the key steps to eliminating mother-to-child transmission.
Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programmes provides antiretroviral treatment (ART) to HIV-positive pregnant women to stop their infants from acquiring the virus.
Maternal HIV viral load (VL) has been identified as a strong predictor of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) risk.
The plan also urges greater integration of these efforts into maternal and child health programs and especially efforts to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of other diseases such as perinatal hepatitis B and Chagas disease.
[2-6] A greater proportion of these children get infected through mother-to-child transmission. Studies have demonstrated that early diagnosis and treatment can reduce morbidity and mortality among these children.
(4) In particular, the use of antiretroviral drugs to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) has expanded massively since the first reports of zidovudine (ZDV) prophylaxis, and many countries have initiated programs to prevent HIV vertical transmission with the result that today MTCT rates of HIV infection are as low as 1% in developed countries and <5% in developing countries.
Dr Carissa Etienne of the Pan American Health Organisation said Cuba's success "provides inspiration for other countries to advance towards elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis."
Cuba has become the first country to receive official validation from the World Health Organization that it has eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis - an achievement that officials credit to a long-standing tradition of universal health care coverage and access.
59.7% of patients were infected by the parenteral route (injecting drug use, use of contaminated needles and syringes, transfusion of infected blood); sexual transmission made 36.7% of the cases, and mother-to-child transmission - 2.8%.
[6] report that adolescent and young pregnant women are at increased risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and poor maternal and infant health outcomes.
It causes morbidity and mortality of infants and children, pertaining to its mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) risk.