motivated forgetting

motivated forgetting

[′mōd·ə‚vād·əd fər′ged·iŋ]
(psychology)
Forgetting, such as by repression, activated by the needs of the individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
semantic memory, retrieval, incidental and motivated forgetting, and autobiographical memory.
Indeed, researchers suggest that, in recalling immoral actions, people may exhibit memory biases such as moral disengagement and motivated forgetting that function selectively to inhibit discomforting recollections (Shu & Gino, 2012; Shu, Gino, & Bazerman, 2011).
Coverage includes an overview of what memory is, short-term memory, working memory, learning, episodic memory, semantic memory and stored knowledge, autobiographical memory, retrieval, incidental forgetting, motivated forgetting, amnesia, memory in childhood, aging, eyewitness testimony, prospective memory, and improving one's memory.
Freud regarded repression as a process in which the motivated forgetting of disturbing or threatening information occurs either unconsciously or with an intentional push.
Repression has long been regarded as a kind of motivated forgetting of highly emotional or threatening memories.